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Could AI Turn Your Podcast Into A Best-Selling Book?

June 23, 2023 Buzzsprout Episode 105
Could AI Turn Your Podcast Into A Best-Selling Book?
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Buzzcast
Could AI Turn Your Podcast Into A Best-Selling Book?
Jun 23, 2023 Episode 105
Buzzsprout

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Can you spot the difference between a real podcast and a fake one? Join us on this episode as we put our skills to the test in a thrilling game of podcast fact or fiction. Then discover Podium's innovative new product, Podbook, which offers a new way for podcasters to repurpose their content. Finally, we examine way podcasts have shaped the entertainment industry over the last 20 years.

View the DISCUSSION THREAD on Twitter!

PODBOOK BY PODIUM
Podbook is an AI-powered application that will transform your podcast into a book! It is currently in closed beta. Add yourself to the waitlist to try it out.
Read the Huberman Lab example

20 YEARS OF PODCASTING
How podcasts took over the world in 20 years.
See the Police Department that launched a podcast to get more involved in their community.

CANVA INTEGRATION
Check out Alban's Loom video that explains how to find your artwork from Canva's integration in your account.

📣 SOUND-OFF QUESTION: What podcasting tool would you be devastated to never use again?
To have your response featured on our next episode, leave a 30-second voice message at podinbox.com/buzzsprout, send a boostagram, or tweet the answer @BuzzcastPodcast!


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Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Send us a Text Message.

Can you spot the difference between a real podcast and a fake one? Join us on this episode as we put our skills to the test in a thrilling game of podcast fact or fiction. Then discover Podium's innovative new product, Podbook, which offers a new way for podcasters to repurpose their content. Finally, we examine way podcasts have shaped the entertainment industry over the last 20 years.

View the DISCUSSION THREAD on Twitter!

PODBOOK BY PODIUM
Podbook is an AI-powered application that will transform your podcast into a book! It is currently in closed beta. Add yourself to the waitlist to try it out.
Read the Huberman Lab example

20 YEARS OF PODCASTING
How podcasts took over the world in 20 years.
See the Police Department that launched a podcast to get more involved in their community.

CANVA INTEGRATION
Check out Alban's Loom video that explains how to find your artwork from Canva's integration in your account.

📣 SOUND-OFF QUESTION: What podcasting tool would you be devastated to never use again?
To have your response featured on our next episode, leave a 30-second voice message at podinbox.com/buzzsprout, send a boostagram, or tweet the answer @BuzzcastPodcast!


The Influence Factor by The Influencer Marketing Factory
Top 1% Podcast About Influencer Marketing, Creator Economy, Social Commerce and more.

Listen on: Apple Podcasts   Spotify

PodMatch
PodMatch Automatically Matches Ideal Podcast Guests and Hosts For Interviews

Support the Show.

Contact Buzzcast

Thanks for listening & keep podcasting!

Kevin:

All right. So, Jordan, where are you? Looks different.

Jordan:

Oh man, I am borrowing my friend's house. The building next door to me, literally right outside my window, was purchased by somebody and they started renovations And so Well, you said it can't be louder than it was. Yeah, I said that because I'm an idiot. You might notice on the outline that I have unnamed game.

Alban:

I did notice that.

Jordan:

I was just workshopping it, workshopping it and I couldn't quite come up with something. I thought maybe it would be called like pod or fraud, or show or sham, like neither one sounds good. So it is just an untitled game.

Kevin:

All right, I'm in, let's go.

Jordan:

So what it is, is I'm going to tell you about a podcast, and you have to tell me if it is a real podcast or a fake one.

Alban:

Oh, easy, easy.

Jordan:

Easy, yeah, ok, and listeners can play along with this one too, so it's a good one.

Alban:

Here's what we need to set the ground rules for Jordan. Ok, How do you buzz in? This has been a contentious point in every game Kevin and I have had. What's the buzz in strategy?

Jordan:

I think this is more of a discussion, not just who can answer first.

Alban:

So it's not competitive.

Kevin:

No, You know who the competitive one in the group is?

Sarah :

I know right.

Alban:

Kevin's the one practicing pickleball in between our hangout pickleball times. I mean I'm not the only competitive one.

Kevin:

Wanting to be the best for your own purposes is different than needing to be better than everyone else.

Alban:

I want to be the best at this unnamed game for your own self or myself.

Kevin:

It does All right, Jordan, we're ready.

Jordan:

All right, you ready for the first one?

Kevin:

Yep.

Jordan:

This is called Songs of the Wind. It has 188 episodes and 42 ratings. Listen to the enchanting sounds of unique whistles as the hosts discuss their history and cultural significance. They featured special guests like Barry Manilow and world champion Whistler Sean Lomax.

Alban:

OK, it's either everything's true or totally fabricated by you. Is that correct, yeah?

Kevin:

Can I ask a question?

Jordan:

Yeah, well, maybe I don't know if I'll answer it Has.

Kevin:

Mariah Carey ever been on this. How would I know?

Jordan:

that.

Kevin:

Well, if it's a real podcast, you would know, right, Oh?

Jordan:

yeah, i don't know everything about all these podcasts, just so you know.

Alban:

I think I'm just going with. This is real. It's very strange, but I think it's real.

Kevin:

I think Barry Manilow is. He would be. I mean, I'd be a heck of a guest to have on a show that's not super well known. But I also feel like that's a weird one for Jordan just to kind of pull out of her hat, Like if she's like I'm going to make up a popular guest. I'm going to go with Barry Manilow. I think it's Barry's a little before her time, So I'm also going to go with. It's a real podcast.

Jordan:

It is fake, i made it up.

Jackie:

Wow, where'd you, where'd you pull the Barry Manilow reference from?

Jordan:

I looked up famous whistlers. I Googled it.

Kevin:

I grew up like all my memories before age five have some sort of Barry Manilow playing in the background. My parents have both loved Barry.

Alban:

Manilow, I'm sorry. Barry Manilow is a famous whistler. Yeah, he is All right, Kevin. we're 0 for 1 as a team, since this is not competitive, apparently. Jordan hit us with number two.

Jordan:

All right. Number two whatever happened to pizza at McDonald's? It has 312 episodes and 316 ratings.

Alban:

Real.

Jordan:

An investigative journalist is convinced that the fast food chain used to serve pizza, and he's determined to do everything possible and impossible to get to the bottom of why it no longer exists.

Kevin:

I just went out hard, just real.

Alban:

Ok, i've got a few reasons why. One, this title sounds very familiar So I think I might have heard it. And then two, just the structure of the game would be a little bit bold for you to come out back to back fakes, so I'm already leaning kind of pretty heavy on is going to be real Statistically. This also is the kind of weird thing somebody would make into a podcast.

Kevin:

Alvin's SAT strategy C was the last one. I knew that one. I can't have two C's next to each other.

Alban:

This is how I got like 870 on the SAT. Like well, they were in B again.

Kevin:

My SAT strategy was very different. I was like this is like they're messing with me. They're all B's, everything's, b, everything's.

Alban:

B. This is a rumor. I don't know if this is true, but supposedly a statistics professor at my college did just make all the answers B one year on the test and like nobody passed because everyone's just like no, there's no way, There's no way.

Kevin:

There's no way.

Jordan:

Yeah, that is so funny.

Kevin:

You did that first statistics class. that would really mess with people Like what are the odds that all of the answers are B? And if you get that right, then you're going to get the whole test wrong.

Jordan:

Yeah, what if I made every single one of these podcasts fake?

Kevin:

It's very real possibility. Jordan's the type of person that would do that to us, Alvin.

Alban:

No, i think Jordan would not. I think that would be. I think you might do that, kevin. I think that seems a little bit Kevin-ish. Wait, can we get the episode numbers and the review numbers again?

Jordan:

Yeah, so it's 312 episodes and 316 ratings.

Kevin:

Whoa, i don't think you can do this for 312 episodes. Alvin, yeah, is it reminiscent of like a technical deep dive from Reply All right, where they take something obscure like this to try to get to the bottom of it And they do that whole thing in 45 minutes to get to the bottom of it? I don't think you can do this for 312 episodes. Ok here's.

Alban:

my theory is that it started out as the McDonald's thing And then it converted into a podcast about the Mandela Effect, where people have these like very strong memories of things that weren't real.

Jordan:

That's so weird Yeah.

Alban:

So that's my guess is that's what the podcast ended up being.

Kevin:

People are like confusing their school lunch with something they ordered at McDonald's. one time I know they had Mexican pizza. It was octagon shape.

Alban:

I know it, I was there, All right. I mean I'm in for real Kevin.

Kevin:

Well, i guess we're not on the team anymore because I have to go fake on this one.

Jordan:

All right, this is a real podcast.

Kevin:

Should have stuck with my teammate. Never leave your wingman.

Jordan:

All right. next up we have Chumbology, and it's 109 episodes and 16 ratings. A Chumbawamba anthology podcast that deep dives into Chumbawamba's entire discography, one song at a time.

Kevin:

Chumbawamba, chumbawamba. I get knocked down, but I get up again. That's Chumbawamba.

Alban:

What's a second Chumbawamba song? There is no one that I know of.

Jordan:

Apparently. There's at least 109 Chumbawamba songs.

Kevin:

I believe that. I believe that that was such a big hit, they had to believe somewhere deep in their soul that they could do it again.

Jordan:

There was like some weird podcast I listened to and they talked about that song and apparently like it was pretty significant.

Kevin:

Yeah, that's a huge hit, mega hit. But like, politically. Oh, is politically had some relevance.

Jordan:

Yeah.

Kevin:

I don't know that story. That was a little hint there. All right, I'm going to go real. I feel like there's some super fan out there that's like Kevin, hear me out.

Alban:

Jordan just said she listened to a podcast episode about the Chumbawamba song Mm-hmm. Well, that makes me think that it's a little bit primed for her to have made this up. But on the other hand, there were what? 119 episodes, 109. 109, at least in 16 reviews. Was that the number? Yeah, so that makes me think that sounds about in line with what I would expect from a Chumbawamba podcast.

Jordan:

Lots of episodes and no reviews, so let's go.

Kevin:

Let's team up real podcast.

Jordan:

I think I'm going to go fake podcast, you're going to go fake and then, kevin, you're going We divide it again.

Kevin:

Okay, you're real, yeah.

Jordan:

This is a real podcast.

Kevin:

Boom, Alban, we just learned you don't leave your wingman. We got to stick together on this.

Alban:

How do we know who's the wing person and who's?

Kevin:

the main flyer? I don't know, i don't. We'll figure that out as we go.

Jordan:

Okay, next up we have Sinister Pixel 58 episodes, 286 ratings. The host explore the dark side of gaming, researching urban legends and eerie stories surrounding haunted video games, from glitchy NPCs with a mind of their own to haunted save files that mysteriously appear and curse devices.

Kevin:

Okay, i'm just going to say right off the bat If this is not a real podcast, it needs to be. Sinister Pixels is a banger name and that's a banger topic, because we all know, unequivably, unequivocably, without a doubt, without a shadow of a doubt, some games are possessed. What's one possessed game? I don't know, but I've got a lot of games.

Sarah :

I don't know, but I've gotten to points in games where I'm like this thing is actively fighting against me in my whole life right now.

Kevin:

Maybe they're just difficult. Okay, i think it's too good of an idea to give, like you just made it up. I think it's too great. It's got to be real.

Alban:

I think I'm going with Kevin. Don't leave your wing man. Yeah, real.

Jordan:

All right, i made this up. This is not a real podcast. No, you did not.

Kevin:

Kevin, that's so good. You need to sell that idea to somebody.

Jordan:

Thank you, that sounds so real.

Kevin:

You'd be 56 episodes in and have 200 and something ratings Like there's going to be a following on that show. Yeah, i got awesome ideas.

Jordan:

I do have awesome ideas. They're in there, i swear. Next up, we have dinner with Mary. It's an eight episode series with 157 ratings. an audio drama slash, dark comedy about Typhoid Mary and the race to stop her from affecting more unsuspecting victims. Do you know the story of Typhoid Mary?

Kevin:

I don't.

Alban:

Yeah, I mean, it's how we figured out the Typhoid You can be a carrier for it but not actually be like infected or not be having like an active infection. Is that the way to say it, Jordan?

Jordan:

Yeah, you don't have any like symptoms. She was a chef, like a cook, for a lot of families and she infected all the families. She killed like a ton of people.

Alban:

They kept having Typhoid outbreaks and then they'd be like oh, i think it's connected to this woman. And then she's like fine, i'm never, ever, be a chef again and I'll make sure I wash my hands and they're like all right, you're off.

Jordan:

And then it happened again.

Alban:

And I think it happened again.

Jordan:

Oh, again and again, yeah.

Alban:

And didn't she end up like she died on Rikers Island or something? She ended up like getting thrown in jail.

Kevin:

So wait, once they made this discovery and they told her then, she still knowingly went infected with other people.

Alban:

Yeah.

Kevin:

Oh yeah, she got to put her somewhere then.

Alban:

And I think they, like, gave her a third chance, which I feel like. If you're responsible for people's death and you had no way of knowing, then I understand letting her off the first time. The second time is like all right, you don't get a third chance.

Jordan:

Yeah, i think she's tied to like 160 cases.

Kevin:

I think I'm a bit of a Typhoid Mary, but like I think I spread positivity and joy, unbeknownst to myself. People are like he's certainly not spreading positivity and joy, but I think I do, but I don't really know it, but everyone's always happier for having spent some time with me.

Jordan:

I've been a Typhoid Mary myself.

Alban:

You aren't showing any symptoms of happiness and joy, kevin, but you're definitely infecting others. I know That's the thing I'm leaning into. True, on this, jordan. It just seems like so many of these top podcasts are true crime related. It's a story that I feel like could be stretched out over eight episodes audio drama, dark comedy. It kind of seems like it makes sense, so I'm in for It's Real.

Kevin:

Yeah, i don't have a strong hunch on here, except I know not to leave my wingman. So I'm with you, Alban, let's go So are the wingman.

Alban:

I think it's got a zero.

Jordan:

Yeah, I mean you're both wrong. I totally made that up.

Kevin:

But we go down together and that feels better than going down alone, we are below 50% of this.

Jordan:

All right. Next up I have Valley Heat 15 episodes, 483 ratings.

Kevin:

A lot of ratings for 14 episodes.

Jordan:

A man starts a podcast to chronicle suspicious activity around his home and provide commentary on his neighbors.

Kevin:

And comment that's out of left field and commentary on his neighbors.

Jordan:

Yeah, he talks about his neighbors.

Kevin:

Why Like paranormal activity around his home? No suspicious activity And suspicious activity. Oh, maybe the suspicious activity is from the neighbors.

Jordan:

No, yeah, he's just talking about his neighbors.

Kevin:

Does this say anything about paranormal or supernatural stuff? Or is it just? No, there's nothing spooky, just suspicious stuff. Give it a like.

Alban:

Okay. So what's supposed to be spooky about this? And you didn't say anything about spooky Nothing.

Jordan:

There's nothing paranormal, it's just a guy talking about his neighbors.

Alban:

A guy talking about his neighbors on a podcast called Valley Heat. That's just blowing up. Mm-hmm, it's 15 episodes 15 episodes is not that many. Is this a famous person? No, a totally random guy started a podcast called Valley Heat. It doesn't even explain what it's about.

Kevin:

We're leaning the same way, Alvin. Listen, this can't be real.

Alban:

No, it can't be real, which means it's real.

Kevin:

That's what I'm thinking. You're right. It probably is real, because Jordan would have made up something that sounds much more positive.

Jordan:

Yeah, So this is real right.

Alban:

Yes, this is fully real.

Jordan:

Yes, yes, you got one, you did it, you stuck it out, Kevin.

Kevin:

We hacked the game.

Jordan:

And I don't think the guy's famous, but he's a comedian And so it is very funny. I've listened to a couple episodes. It's very funny. I think you'd actually like it.

Kevin:

I think we did pretty good.

Jordan:

You guys did pretty good. I think what we found from this is that I have a lot of really good ideas.

Kevin:

I think you have.

Jordan:

Yes, i started pitching podcasts.

Kevin:

I think you should offer a little service though, like on Twitter or something, where somebody sends you. You can send money through Twitter. Now, right, somebody should send you like 10 bucks, and then you just come back with one of Jordan's random great podcast ideas.

Jordan:

It's $10. Yeah, you guys put 10 bucks.

Kevin:

You want more? Yeah Well, it doesn't have to be. The more you pay, the better the idea.

Jordan:

I think sinister pixels were at least. I don't know how much did Meghan Markle get paid.

Kevin:

The same contract Meghan Markle had.

Jordan:

So this is kind of interesting. Podium has released a new product that they are calling Podbook, and it's an AI-powered application that takes podcast episodes and turns them into full fledged books. This is really cool because a lot of podcasters try to find ways to repurpose their podcast content, but writing a book is a lot of work And a lot of times what people will do is take their podcast transcripts and then just kind of re-edit it, and Podium is saying that Podbook ensures that the transform content reads like a book instead of a transcribed podcast. So it's kind of doing a lot of the work for you, which is cool. Did you guys take a look at it at all?

Alban:

Yeah, I think it's kind of skimmed through the. There's an example of the Huberman Lab book. Yeah And me. It reads like a Huberman Lab podcast And I could see if you gave, like I don't know, the 400 hours of Huberman Lab or whatever is out there to somebody who is a decent writer and said, hey, take this and organize it to a book. This might be about what they would come back with. It may not be right where you're ready to publish it, but they've been able to kind of pull together different pieces out of different episodes and organize it into something that starts reading like a book.

Jordan:

The beginning of their example that they have for the Huberman Lab. I'll link to this. In the show notes There's a disclaimer and it says this book is unedited and may contain factual errors and AI hallucinations, At which point I immediately started reading through it, trying to find that There wasn't a lot of weird errors or anything like that. I was actually pleasantly surprised.

Alban:

The one. That's what we think, until you're like oh yeah, norepinephrine is really valuable in this, and you're just like taking medicines that don't exist. Like then, it's not working out very well.

Jordan:

I guess that's true, like if it was a podcast about a topic that I knew more about, as opposed to like health and fitness and wellness or whatever, like I'd probably be able to sleuth out the mistakes a little bit more easily.

Kevin:

One of the use cases that popped into mind immediately when I read this was we have a podcast called How to Start a Podcast, and what's the latest version of that? Is it like seven episodes or maybe 10? I think 10. Okay, so it's 10 episode podcast series and each of the episodes, like could be a chapter in a short book about how to start a podcast. We've never actually taken that and created a book out of it, but, like, why not? We certainly have blog posts about like each one of those topics, or at least two or three blog posts might equal one episode or something like that. But I was really interested to figure out, like, if we ran that podcast through this service, what it would come back with, and then how much work would it be from there for us to publish a small version, a small book that we could like hand out at conferences or something like that.

Jordan:

That's interesting. We should get on the wait list and then test it out with how to start a podcast.

Kevin:

Yeah, i would love to see what it would do with something like that. And then it also made me think about you know, that's kind of like a course, and so I was in that mindset of thinking through course material. Oftentimes it's a pretty daunting task for somebody who has a great idea and has a lot of expertise in an area. A lot of podcasters do this. They have courses that they're going to teach something, whether it be photography, or they're going to teach something in YouTube or I don't even know what else you could teach. What are a lot of digital courses like do marketing or web design? There's a lot of digital courses How to make your own clothes How to make your own clothes.

Alban:

There you go, perfect.

Kevin:

But instead of like opening up that blank page, which is an intimidating place to start when writing a book, maybe what you could do is you could start recording podcast episodes of yourself just talking about individual topics. And then I wonder if this running it through something like this could help you start to organize the ideas. Or it might take something from episode one and episode three and episode 11 and put them together into a chapter one type outline for you. So I haven't tested it, but I feel like this technology certainly has the potential to be able to do stuff like that. So for digital course makers like, instead of starting with your book and then recording all your videos and recording your podcasts and all that stuff, maybe you just start with your podcast or your videos, because it might be easier for you to talk about your topic first and then let AI help you transition that into the written word.

Jordan:

I've always wanted to do my personal podcast is bedtime stories and I've always wanted to do like a collection of my favorite stories, i mean, especially since I've done a lot of like different adaptations of myths and legends and like I've always wanted to do like a sort of small treasury of my favorite myths and legends, and so it'd be kind of fun to test this out with that.

Alban:

I think yours would be pretty easy to do, right, because you've scripted all of yours And if you're saying, hey, here's the collection of the 15 stories that I love the most, and now you can read them to your kids at night, and you could just read my version of it, i feel like you're 90% of the way there already.

Jordan:

Yeah, now that I think about it, i think maybe my biggest hang up is illustration.

Alban:

So we'll get on mid journey and Jordan I once she was doing. What was it? It was a podcast about something about some Egyptian God, right.

Jordan:

I'm working on. I want to do a new series that's based on the mythology of like Egyptian gods. So I haven't done it yet, but I'm working on it.

Alban:

So I started making like images of raw and they came out pretty good. I was pretty impressed with them, so maybe you'll let me do the illustrations for it. I'll use a mid journey and make you some illustrations.

Sarah :

Yeah.

Kevin:

Yeah, and here's a little hack If you have a podcast like Jordan's and you wanted to try a service like this but Jordan, you have lots and lots of episodes on dreamful, but maybe what you would want to do is like choose your favorites or choose the theme, or something like that You could go tag all of those episodes in Buzzsprout. You could add a keyword tag to all of those And then you can generate an RSS feed that only returns episodes with that tag on it What Really? And then you can pass that into the podium. Bookmaker. Whoa, how do you do that? So you can go into any episode. We all know this part, right?

Kevin:

And you can hit edit and then you can scroll down to the advanced section and here's tags. So under tags I can write book. So now it's got a tag of book on it Save the episode.

Kevin:

And then what I can do is I can go over to like players and you see these options here where it says like all episodes or only episodes with certain tags, and then I can write book in the tag and look what it does to the code, changes the code So that says tags, dash, books or book, whatever I added there. Well, you can take that little bit of code and you can put that right on the end of your RSS link and it will do the same thing. I'll just give you an RSS feed with just the episodes that are tagged with the book.

Alban:

Whoa. So is this something we're doing, kevin, to be able to filter in the embed player, or is this something that's built into RSS?

Kevin:

It's not built into RSS. It comes kind of free with Rails, the language that we use to create Buzzsprout. with that we coded in. It's just kind of like a free feature. So we built the technology to be able to have tags and then we use those. We implemented those tags in a certain way to be able to limit like playlists and stuff If you have like a multi-episode player or if you only want to embed episodes with certain tags. But then once you built that, you kind of get that free in other areas too, and one of those areas is in the RSS feed. So if you only want your RSS feed to bring back certain episodes, you can use tags to do that. It's not really like a feature that we highlight in the UI. It would be considered a little bit of a hack, but it would certainly work, i mean the feature has been there for I don't know 10 years and I've never seen it.

Alban:

So yeah, it's pretty hidden Yeah.

Jordan:

I've seen it but I knew it was just for a playlist, but I never thought to use that in a way that you It's actually this part right here where it has ampersand tag equals book.

Kevin:

So I'll show you the rest of it. So now we go over to RSS feed and pop this into window and I paste that on there. See how I put. and tags equals book, and now the only episode that's coming back is the one that's tagged with book. So that's our RSS feed, but it's only got one episode, Wow. So for those following along and just listening and not seeing what I'm showing them, you can absolutely do this within Buzzsprout. if you want and you're interested in doing it, you can. maybe we'll put up a help article if enough people want to do it, but if only a few, you're just writing in support and ask them how to do it, we can send you the code to do it. Maybe you mentioned I heard Kevin talk about it on Buzzcast so they can tag me on the support email.

Jordan:

Yeah, that's really cool. I'm thinking of all these different things. I mean, I think that with this book generation, it's probably going to be primarily used for people who do coaching or interviews, things like that, Like just trying to get key takeaways condensed into a book format. But I'm trying to think of my friends that have a D&D podcast. Like would they be able to make their campaign into a fiction story? Like, would that work? I want to play with it so bad and just see what happens.

Kevin:

Yeah, i have a feeling it's not going to be cheap. It sounds like a lot of tech, a lot of transcription has to happen, a lot of prompting that happens in the background and organizing a massive amount of information, so I wouldn't necessarily expect it to be very cheap. I wonder if they have like options to just get like an outline or a sample return for like a low price And then, if you like it, then you can pay the full price for the whole book. But it might be a little bit scary if it's like I don't know. Let's just say it's $200 for whatever 20-page book or something like that. That might be a big pill to swallow to not be sure what the. Your results may vary, you know.

Alban:

Yeah, podium says it can generate anywhere from a 20-page e-book to a 250-page bestseller. I would obviously opt out for the 250-page bestseller. Yeah, i'll take the bestseller. Current pricing is still being determined, so pricing will be announced at launch. So we'll find out what it is.

Alban:

I would caution people who think this kind of always happens with repurposing software, that it's like hey, if you take a podcast, then you can turn it into a blog, and turn that blog into a video and that video into four snippets, and then there's four snippets into 17 tweets And everyone has these like giant methods of doing it. I always think those are really good tools as a starting place, but they're often not finalized when you get them. And I would just say I think this is pretty cool. It's probably really helpful for somebody who has put out a bunch of podcasts and they're like I don't really want to go back and listen to everything I've ever said and try to make a book out of it. And now Podbook comes in and says look, let's generate a book.

Alban:

And then you go through and you start editing and you start noticing like, oh, that's wrong, i'd clean that up. Oh, that section should be mixed with this section And as soon as you have something out there, it starts becoming much easier to edit it. And that's how I would look at it as hey, i put together a rough draft, now come in and that could easily save you 50% of the time. But I wouldn't say like generate it and then publish instantly to Amazon Kindle and expect like massive sales. I'd put some real work behind. Let's try to really go through the writing and editing process to make something great.

Jordan:

Yeah, there probably has to be like a level of intentionality with this where you can't just like make a book for the sake of making a book. You know, it's not like I just interview whoever on my couch with my best friend and we're gonna do a book, because that's what people do. And so I think that you know, if you do have a podcast about everything, maybe try to find like threads of commonality between certain episodes and try to group them together to maybe formulate some sort of story or purpose to your book and be very choosy about what episodes you would use.

Alban:

Well, you used Kevin's new feature little hack that he put together and you could use that to be very selective about which episodes go into it.

Jordan:

So a couple of weeks ago it was the 20th anniversary of podcasting and The Guardian published an article examining how podcasting has reshaped our culture in like complex ways. And this is a very, very long article, but I felt like it was a really interesting read and it kind of made me realize that it was like a slow burn. It was just like a very subtle change in the way that we handle our arts and entertainment now because of podcasting. Podcasts have influenced the content and like atmosphere of comedy. It used to be that in order to be a comedian, you had to be in this atmosphere where you're doing all these like clubs at night and like it was very competitive. And now with podcasting, comedians have found that it's better to be more in a community and like have each other on each other's podcast And it's like the rising tides raise all ships within comedy.

Alban:

The whole article is kind of going through the history of podcasting and it uses, i think, like primarily three shows to kind of like draw out the story, and the first one is The Ricky Gervais Show, and here's the quote the kind of illustrates what you're saying, jordan. Podcasts haven't just ballooned audiences, they've helped change the content and tone of comedy itself. The medium is part of the shift away from the gladiatorial nature of 2000's comedy, with its unforgiving club audiences and brutal panel shows, to an overtly friendlier world. Most chat podcasts double as performative friendships. I definitely have noticed this.

Alban:

I don't really listen to any comedy podcasts, but those are the shows that I see on YouTube, and they're podcasts that also have like a video component, and the tone of them is almost always like a group of friends who also happen to be really funny, and so the jokes are not like oh, i'm taking you down. It's actually always like wow, what a cool friendship. And if you look at the YouTube comments, they kind of have that feeling for everybody else. Everyone's like oh man, everyone wants a friend like this person.

Jordan:

Part of it is that these comedians are cutting out, you know, the step of booking and being like on a stage and things like that, and instead what they're doing is they're bringing the audiences in in a really intimate way. So it feels like the listeners are in on the joke, like they feel like the other friend on that couch and they're like having dinner with that person and listening to the funny conversation that they wish they could be in on. And so it's leading to these comedians like selling out live shows and stuff, because they're not having to do all the work of like doing a million clubs and like working their way up. They're just like going straight to what the people want.

Alban:

Yeah, i mean it definitely shows you the power of distribution. My guess is that a lot of these comedy shows are also. This is not just podcasting I'll claim it for podcasting but it's also connected to YouTube And a lot of people just exploring and finding these on YouTube and then they end up on the podcast for a long time. And it's not just like a great joke that you had like two minutes to set up, but it's a great joke that you might have been setting up for months and months, because it's like it's an inside joke and it's grown, it's gotten better and better And you know, you've been to some of these live show type things and it's like everyone's waiting for them to say the totally normal thing that they always say. And then it's like hilarious, because it's an inside joke that only you ever knew in your life. And now you're in a room with everyone who finds the same stupid inside joke hilarious.

Jordan:

You know what I finally watched. I say finally, it just came out, but I'm usually really good at watching things like right when they come out. I watched the smart list documentary on HBO and it was so funny. I don't listen to that podcast, but as I was watching their live shows and kind of like the behind the scenes documentary about them going on tour and like trying to figure that out and stuff, i realized that there's so many inside jokes that they have on that podcast, like, for example, sean's sister Tracy.

Jordan:

I didn't know this, but they're constantly talking to her. It's like they're breaking the fourth wall and just saying like, something like and for Tracy like they explained something aside And it's really for the audience, but they're saying it's for his sister Tracy. It was so interesting because they would have clips from their live show and one of the guys would say something like for Tracy, that's this, and the entire audience would laugh. And my husband and I like we looked at each other and he was just like do you think that they mentioned Tracy a lot in the podcast? I'm like I guess so, because everyone died laughing when he just said something about Tracy. I'm like, who's Tracy? I don't care about Tracy.

Alban:

Exactly, it's like a joke that's been built up over like dozens and dozens of episodes. That for everybody there. It's like oh man, this is killing me.

Jordan:

Yeah.

Alban:

So the next podcast they talked about was Serial. Serial was the moment that podcasting was invented. for a lot of people, obviously it's not the first podcast, but it was the moment that podcasting really went mainstream, at least from my memory, where a lot of people were listening to Serial for the first time, first podcast they were listening to, and I love this. like they kind of say one, it's the first time we had a scripted series that really blew up. It helps kick off the true crime wave of podcasts, which are really big. And then there's this bit from Aaron Hart who's at Wondery and his whole job is to help true crime or true crime adjacent shows turn into scripted series. And there's just this like list of I don't know how many it is. I mean it's like five or six big shows that have come out that were podcast first, like in the last year. And it's just super interesting to see for a lot of networks how valuable it is for something to already be a podcast because a lot of the work has already been done for them.

Kevin:

Well, and again, i haven't read this article, so I'm just listening to this interesting conversation, But I would imagine the risk is a ton lower right. So if you have an idea for a story, or you have an idea like there's some true crime that you think would be interesting to investigate and to tell the story of, it's certainly a lot less risky to tell that story first in podcast format and do it. Even doing it really well, like going all out in the audio format is still going to be order of magnitude less expensive and less risky to see if there's an audience that that is starting to resonate with before we make the full film and television production investment.

Jordan:

Yeah, the research and narrative arc. it's already established with the podcast, like you don't have to do that groundwork. and there are often A-list actors who have listened to the podcast and they say, wow, this should be a series. they get behind it. They're also saying like I want to star in this, i would be perfect for this part. So it has this like momentum behind it, catapulting it into this television series world. It's just, it's hard to argue against something that it's already proved to be popular with people. They're already going to have an audience when it does release on streaming platforms because people are going to want to watch. You know, it's like The Shrink Next Door with Paul Rudd and Will Ferrell Fantastic, fantastic television adaptation of the podcast. And I was so excited because I love the podcast so much And then these like actors were starring in it who I love. It's just like, yeah, i'm going to watch that absolutely.

Kevin:

Didn't they do this with Dr Death? That was podcast first. right Yeah, and became. was it a Netflix show Or I don't know who made the show, but I remember seeing Advertisements for it.

Alban:

I remember, kevin, when we went to podcast movement I think it's Philadelphia, so 2018, we went and I remember somebody saying there's a bunch of people here from Netflix And I was like, really, what are they doing? And that was when I first heard like people are starting to like go around to try to find out what podcasts are big to make them into shows. And I think you're right Like there's just a massive de-risking when you already know the story works. You know, imagine if you go into a story and you're starting to report on it and you're like I think there's something here, like I'm pretty sure there is, and you just don't know Where the podcast is already born out.

Alban:

And this is the maybe more cynical side. I think that the producers probably know it's probably not that expensive to get somebody on board And so they're thinking this person's already made it big, they've already done well for themselves. They'll probably do even better if there's a show, and so I bet we can get them to sign a deal. That's orders of magnitude less than having a screenwriter go and try to do it all And, who knows, we could totally flop. There's just there's so many examples in here. We crashed about the fall of WeWork, the dropout about Theranos, though I guess that was a book first. I don't know if that counts Ben Affleck movie Air, that was about Air Jordans. That was the podcast first. That was the podcast first.

Sarah :

Ahh.

Kevin:

This makes me think I should check my spam filter, because I feel like we probably have lots of deals.

Jordan:

I'm sure people wanted to make sure motion picture version of buzzcast.

Kevin:

I probably just missed the email.

Alban:

Yeah, marcus, for a few episodes ago has been trying to make quite a while. Did any of you see this? this was the most interesting part to me. There is a movie called Flaming Hot, the origin story of Flaming Hot Cheetos.

Jordan:

I just saw the trailer for that this weekend and I was like I kind of want to watch this.

Alban:

I want to watch it and listen to it. I mean, flaming Hot Cheetos are some of my favorite foods.

Jordan:

Well, now I have to listen to the podcast first.

Alban:

Just in solidarity, i think the story is that it's a janitor who comes up with it. They're like trying to figure out like what's next for Cheetos, and there's a janitor He's like why don't you make them hot? They're like, no way. It ends up being like the biggest product that they'd had in like 30 years.

Kevin:

Well, you never know When genius will strike.

Jordan:

I think one of the things that also kind of plays into this being like a safe bet when you take a podcast and put it into TV series or readapt it for something else, is that this article kind of talks about how podcasts have contributed to an emergence of like a growing group of fans who are so dedicated and I love this term and they have like casual obsession With seeking new tidbits of information. Like they just get like Minerally obsessed with topics, and so that's why true crime is so popular with people is because it's the same stories over and over again But it's told by different people. There might be a detail that was left out here and they don't get tired of hearing these same stories over and over again. That kind of like ties into these things just being remade and it still has a really wide audience because people are like Oh, i, i could hear this again. We're just obsessed with being told these stories all the time.

Alban:

Maybe you're saying more of the true crime. I got that sense from the music ones, the music podcast because it's saying, like Song Explorer kicked off this whole genre of music podcast where people would listen to an entire discography, where there be deep interviews with the people who created the music, and Then it creates this like super fandom for music That's not just for people who are kind of like super into the music that now there's this whole creative side And there's a personality side and there's so much more that you can learn and kind of become a true, really deep fan, even outside of whether or not you initially connected right with the music the first time you heard it.

Kevin:

So, jordan, are you saying that they're true crime podcasts, that a lot of them are telling the same stories? Oh yeah, oh, so I didn't know this guy. I don't listen to a lot of true crime, so I do listen to some of the ones that become more popular people start talking about. But so you're saying, like bearbrook, whatever, that's a popular true crime. You're saying there's probably maybe dozens of other podcasts that also tell the bearbrook story different ways.

Jordan:

Yeah, i mean it's interesting because it's kind of like how we have this big surge of commentary podcasts Where there's like a TV show or a series and like now there's all these commentary podcasts that are really popular Because people like hearing the thing like rehashed.

Jordan:

It's like you get to talk about to somebody like water cooler talk You get to like finally talk to someone who watched the same show as you and I feel like there's a lot of Commentary true crime podcasts where it's not investigative, it's just them telling you about the story, why it's interesting, what went wrong with the investigation, things like that. And then you also get podcasts where it might be. It's like the tidbits of information that you didn't get the first time and you get to hear it a little bit more in depth, especially the more interesting ones. Yeah, okay.

Kevin:

So my wife was telling is it crime junkie? Is that one of the commentary ones?

Jordan:

Yeah, true crime obsessed is another one, but it's I think that's the one she was talking about.

Kevin:

Yeah, that rings a bell. So that is just people talking about other true crime podcasts and kind of like re. They retell the story a little bit And then they put their spin on everything. They ask their questions. They make a lot of jokes like my wife's always cracking up when she's listening to it And I was thinking it's weird that she's listening to true crime while laughing hysterically.

Jordan:

Yeah, they watch like documentaries and TV shows and series and things like that. And it's funny because a lot of these channels, like the ID channel, actually goes to them, or Netflix goes to them and says, will you Commentate on this new series that we're launching? and then they'll do it. So it's them being asked to talk about it. And it's interesting because they play clips from these TV shows and then talk about it. So it's, it's weird. It feels like you're watching it with them.

Kevin:

I feel like these are totally new genres that and maybe it's the point the article is making like totally new genres are types of Media for us to consume that we owe the advent of podcasting to their creation, right Like we just talked about this a little bit in comedy, but one of the most popular comedy podcast right now is I can't remember what's called, but it's David Spade and Dana Carvey. They're doing a show together fly on the wall.

Jordan:

Fly on the wall.

Kevin:

Yeah, and that show is similar to smart list, right, but you have comedic geniuses like coming together and Sometimes they're just, you know, bantering the two of them. Sometimes they're interviewing other people, sometimes they're doing live events and they're recording those, but those are like one of the chances you go to a comedy club and it happens to be Dana Carvey and David Spade together that night Performing at your local comedy club like none, especially Boise.

Kevin:

Right. But now you can listen to them do this every week and I feel like the barrier of entry for them is super low, because what's their commitment? Oh, for an hour once a week I have to log into my zoom or whatever or Riverside or squad cast or something, and I get on the phone with one of my comedy buddies And we're gonna interview somebody that we we know something about or they're famous or they're funny, and I just be myself and happens to be who I am. After you know 30 or 40 years of intense training is a really funny individual Like I can think of my feet really quick. I can make a lot of funny jokes.

Kevin:

That didn't exist. You couldn't just go see people, just be normal and have conversations with other people. Even the comedy club scene if you happen to Go to the best comedy club scene They're still gonna get up and do their bit. This is not them doing their bit. This is just them being funny and witty and under feet and asking silly questions and taking them silly directions. So that's one of the great things about podcasting is it's it's not just like a retelling or a New iteration of old things. It's like actually new types of entertainment or new types of reporting. It's giving normal people, whether they be in comedy or true kind interests or musicians or whatever. It's giving them access to be able to transmit or broadcast new stuff in a new way. I mean, that's what podcasting is really kind of about.

Jordan:

Yeah, and I think one of the things that this article did not talk about is what an impact Podcasting can have on a community as well and on a more like local level actually saw this local news article in Texas talking about how a police department had launched a podcast and They interview each individual officer and the officers are allowed to just kind of like Relax and talk about their lives, talk about like scary situations that they've been in or funny stories. I was really interested to hear this one episode. There was a detective who actually ran like six computers in order to catch the predators And it was so fascinating to listen to that. But, yeah, so it's. It's kind of cool that just a little police department's doing this.

Alban:

I really liked it because they talk about the need to rebuild trust and then the way that they're doing that is by sharing a bit more in-depth about the officers. And I do think if, like there was one about Jacksonville Beach, florida we're only a town of 27,000 people and Police department here had a podcast, or City Hall had a podcast, or there was like a local beat, i would probably listen to that podcast religiously and It would make you feel much more connected to the community You are a part of. If you were hearing, like, the personal stories of the people from your area. So I think it's very cool They're doing it.

Alban:

I noticed that they said a lot of new recruits have cited the podcast. I'm surprised that it's been a good recruiting tool. I would would be really interested to hear how it's or if it has affected their policing at all. If there are people who are like They're getting pulled over for a traffic violation and they feel like, oh, i felt a little bit more ease. I didn't get all stressed out and worked up because all of a sudden I realized like, oh, these are the people I've been listening to for however you know amount of time. I think that could help keep people's you know their stress levels a little bit lower during some of these encounters.

Jordan:

Yeah, absolutely, and I think that it was a big risk and I wish more police departments would do something like this, or city hall, you know, like Public servants would do a podcast for their community, because it's a great way to relay information, it's a great way to get people to know you, and I Understand that it's really scary to like let people in, especially in a public manner, and people that you might see in real life. I know for us It's not that scary because we're never gonna see somebody who knows us. We can just say whatever.

Kevin:

Well, that's why we get nervous before we go to podcast. Move in every year. The level of connection that you feel when you listen to podcasts on a regular basis with the hosts, with the co-hosts, with the guests, is Tangibly different than most other things. Whether you're reading an interview by them or even if you're watching a video, it just it still feels a little bit like Hollywood versus listening to a podcast just feels more real, like you're getting to know somebody better And if you listen to them on a regular basis, then you really get to start to know them. So we've talked about this before, where we do bump into people who might have listened to our show, they might know a little bit about us at a podcast conference and we're like oh wow, you like you really do listen. Sometimes It's a little bit weird, but mostly it's. It's fun and enjoyable experience for for both people. Sometimes it feels a little bit more weird on the listener side, like I know a lot more about them than I probably should. This is the first time I've ever met them, but I listen to them every week and it makes me think, like I think this is a great thing that this police I don't know police force. What do they call themselves? police squad? This police squad is doing for their local community.

Kevin:

But, as we're you know, presidential candidates are all announcing and The election is starting to ramp up a little bit. They're all starting the campaign and I'm wondering is this the year that Presidential candidates, if podcasting, starts to become a big thing in the campaigning cycle? So I just did a little bit of research and I just went to a couple of the candidate sites that have already announced They're starting to get a little bit of traction behind them And I'm not seeing any podcasts yet by any of these candidates. And I didn't do like a full investigation. But I hit the top three or four, at least the ones that when I typed in who's running for President for 2024, i went to the top three or four who had been listed and I didn't see any podcasts yet. But I'm wondering are we gonna see presidential candidates start podcasting?

Jordan:

I just saw an article about how there's so much ad spend going on right now with political campaigns, like there's just a ton of these ads getting played and bought in the podcasting space. Why would you spend all that money on an ad when you could have a podcast? that would really push forward Your message that you're trying to get across. It's so much cheaper.

Kevin:

Yeah, who was it? who did that was an FDR who started the fireside chats and did the weekly radio broadcast to America while he was president.

Jordan:

Yeah, i saw a thing that was talking about how he could be like the podcast president. You had like the radio president, you had the whatever president, the Twitter president.

Kevin:

Yeah, we need. We need the podcast, president. Like I do think it would be a great opportunity, especially when you're campaigning. But then obviously, whoever wins and is in office, all Americans would then have access to be able to listen to a weekly address, and it doesn't have to necessarily be long or short, but kind of what's going on from their perspective and I just feel like the the opportunity to connect with people. It hits different when you're listening to it, like in a pair of headphones, when you're out walking your dog and you're listening to the president talk to you. Give us fireside chat technologies here to deliver it right to our phones every week, and certainly useful on the campaign trail.

Alban:

I like this idea a lot, kevin, because it really hits on like authenticity And when you hear somebody talk about something a lot, you can tell why it's important to them and that they really mean it. And some Things are just a sound bite and it was crafted by you know Some writer who came up with it, but some things are like actually from the person's experience, this is something that's deeply important to them and it sounds silly until you hear about it. I remember this anecdote about when Ross Perot ran for president that they found out if they didn't have Ross Perot tell the story about His life and why he was running for president, nobody liked him. Everyone was like this guy's kind of weird. He's got weird views, but if they started with here's who I am, here's what's important to me, and then told his views, that people's view of him was so much more positive. And I think that the medium you use really influences the type of messages you can send And if you're on Twitter as a political candidate, you're going to be combative, like that's just the only way to interact in that medium.

Alban:

You know, we've seen other politicians really lean into like short form video, i think, like Instagram or TikTok. You've seen some of that now. I would really enjoy it to be able to. There was like a 45 minute talk and you could kind of see like views shift. Now I know that they'd get dunked on like all your your silly comments that you made out of, would be pulled out of context to be thrown online. It might end up on a radio show or something and you'd be frustrated by that. But it would be an opportunity for people who were your like I don't know what the political term for this is, but like the super fans, the people who really support, who might financially support for them to be connected to the campaign and then hopefully eventually to the actually governing, and learn what's happening and what's important and how are you thinking through problems, because then it helps people understand. Even when you make mistakes they could see it wasn't like a malicious mistake, it was just a different opinion about how to do something.

Jordan:

It's time for sound off the segment where you are listeners and, in your tips, tricks and podcasting, advice and, lately, just personal stories, which I've actually been really enjoying. Let's kick it off with some buzzboosts. Now that we got our buzzboost fixed, it looks like it's working pretty well.

Kevin:

Yeah, I'm excited We got some new names in here.

Jordan:

Yeah, we do. First one we have is from Sam Sethi which says Pod fans payment. Thanks, sam.

Kevin:

I think I'm assuming that Sam was testing payments sent from Pod fans, his new podcasting app, so if you haven't heard about Pod fans, go check it out. I think it's podfansfm, which is really cool, so you can hop over to that URL and you can join the wait list. It looks to be a very interesting application. So if you're a podcaster, into podcasting, check it out podfansfm.

Alban:

We had another boost from the late bloomer actor test boost. Please ignore LOL. Love the episode team and thank you for the info regarding cohost AI and past episodes. Yes, transcripts is the biggest desire for past episodes. Love your work, david, aka the late bloomer actor podcast. Thank you, david, we appreciate it.

Kevin:

Next boost was from Brian, and Smigger says I'm pretty sure that the Overcast app will also support chapter artwork using file metadata. I do think you're right on that, Brian. I don't think they will pull from the podcast namespace the new way we do chapters. So if we put the artwork in the episode I think it would show it, But since we link it in an external file, I don't think it will show it there. So, but I'll check into that. Hopefully there's an update to Overcast, but I'm not sure that there is.

Jordan:

Next we have Mirror Mortals podcast. Just to clarify, you put in the chapter name and timestamp into the MP3s on Buzzsprout, but not the artwork. So if I re-download all my audio files and replace my backups, those files will have the tasty baked in. goodness Feels like I'm making a cake and not podcasting over here.

Kevin:

So yes, Karen, that's correct. If you've re-download all your audio and replace your backups, you will have all the MP3 data in the audio files. You just won't have the artwork, but it does have the name of the chapters. If there's a link, I think that gets put in there too and where all those chapters fall. So absolutely.

Alban:

And then we've got some boosts from some anonymous person. This one says you mentioned the Canva integration. It's nice, but art made via it doesn't show up in my Canva account anywhere. Had to recreate it in my account directly to be able to easily do things like episode art and website images. So I think I understand what this person is saying. If you create things in your Canva account, you can't get them into Buzzsprout, and vice versa you can. I actually found an old loom video that I made for Sam Sethi and James Cridlin, who ran into this issue, and if you are in your Canva account and you go to your folders, there is something near the bottom called like all designs, and it should be there. We'll link to the tweet where I have this loom video So you could see if this solves your problem. Hopefully it does. It is a bit hidden, though. I wish there was a better way for it to be exposed.

Kevin:

Yeah, that's a great Canva controls that. We did note it early on when we first integrated with them, and so it never hurts to drop their support team and email with this feature request of making those easier to surface once you log into your Canva account. Okay, next one, also from anonymous Please don't support or promote YouTube's new podcast service. It's a road towards podcast hosts becoming obsolete and not good for the ecosystem. I kind of agree with you, but I'm not totally sure yet. But yeah, that's a possibility. I don't know that there's malicious intent behind it, but whether there is or isn't, like we have no interest in podcast hosts becoming obsolete. It's definitely not good for us and our livelihoods, so we wouldn't want to do anything that leads down that road. So thanks for noting it. We are also on it and we'll continue to monitor and move forward accordingly.

Jordan:

And next one Kevin, you got your 10,000 sats for the test boost. Please ignore, as requested.

Kevin:

Boom. so 10,000 sats work Perfect. Now we need to know if 100,000 sats work. So we're almost done with our testing. That's awesome. I wish I knew who did that. There's no name on that one.

Jordan:

I don't know if it's like the same person just being anonymous or if it's several people and something's broken again, but hopefully it's the former and not the latter.

Kevin:

I know in Castamatic and in Fountain, when you go to send a boost, if you look carefully before you hit the boost button, there should be something where it says who you're sending it as or from, and you can change that to be whatever you want. But if it's blank, then when we get your boost we don't see anything. So you can type in whatever you want us to refer to you as if you don't. If you want to remain anonymous but you just want to put a silly name, you can do that. Or you can just type anonymous, or you can leave it blank if you truly do want to be anonymous. But for some of these we would love to know. Like someone just sent us 10,000 sats. We asked for it last week. That's amazing. So whoever you are, thank you so much.

Jordan:

All right, And we have some responses to last episode's sound off question, which was what is the podcast that got you into podcasts? First up we have Matthew.

Matthew:

I'm Matthew from Girl Dad Nation and I'm a big board game fan and I love designing my own games. The first podcast I remember discovering was Board Game Design Lab by Gabe Barrett. Every week, gabe interviews designers and shares tips and tricks for making great games. I've listened to most of his over 300 episodes and I learned he is a fellow girl dad, so naturally I reached out to him and it was a dream come true getting to chat with him on my podcast, board Game Design Lab, just recently relaunched, and I wish him all the best. I look forward to his new episodes.

Jordan:

Man, that's really cool. I wish that I had that experience of like the podcast that got me into podcasts. I was brave enough to like reach out to them and talk to them.

Kevin:

Yeah, very cool Being able to talk to them Yeah that's so cool, all right.

Jordan:

Next up, we have Jackie.

Jackie:

Hi, i'm Jackie. My podcast is Live Last Stuck. It's a homestuck podcast And I started listening to podcasts like on the regular after reading the transcripts for the adventure zone and then deciding that I really needed to listen to it to get to the full experience, like the music and everything. I just have ADHD, so it was hard for me to figure out how to just listen to something. So I actually started out watching tasty videos on mute while listening to the podcast And from then I got into other Macaroy stuff, like my brother, my brother and me and Sawbones, and I just kind of expanded out from there.

Kevin:

That is so good.

Jordan:

Watching tasty videos on mute.

Kevin:

Yes, that's like the tip of the day. Yeah, i always wondered why some of those they pop up on social Instagram and TikTok and Facebook once in a while where somebody's just talking but they're playing like a tasty video or something like they're cutting I don't know, like Moonsand or something like all unique ways, and it is. It's true. It's so much easier to kind of absorb the content that you're listening to if in and of itself that's not visually interesting. That like occupies that part of your brain, the visual side of your brain, so you don't go like looking around the room and getting distracted.

Sarah :

I love it.

Kevin:

I'm going to do that for podcasts that are like good, deep information that I want to absorb, but I keep getting distracted. I'm going to load up some tasty videos.

Jordan:

All right, next up we have Luke.

Luke:

Hello, my name is Luke and I produce a podcast called the Sipsters Wine podcast out of the Okanagan Valley in British Columbia, Canada. The first podcast I listened to was in 2008 and it was called Grape Radio, which was from Napa Valley, California. Fantastic podcast, freely conversational, and I still love emulating that style of just a really casual conversation as part of a podcast. Great job, guys, and enjoy listening. Cheers.

Jordan:

Thanks, luke. I love what you said about you know you listen to this podcast and you still emulate the style of it, because that is one of the greatest ways. one of the best ways to learn about how to podcast is to take the things like cherry pick your favorite things about how other people podcast on your favorite podcast and put it together in your own style, and that really is one of the easiest ways to learn how to do it.

Alban:

We also had two answers over on Twitter that I'll bring in real quick. Rod Clark said his first podcast was My First Million. And then Scott at Not Just An Editor, said the first was definitely YouTube Creators Hub by Dusty Porter, and my favorite thing about this was that Dusty Porter then responds wow, this is awesome to hear. Thank you so much for the comments And it's just so cool to me that we asked this question and we connected someone's first podcast with the creator and they were excited to hear this is the podcast they got somebody into podcasting.

Jordan:

That's so cool. We actually have one more voice message that I got this morning and it's going to finally settle the age old question. how do you pronounce Sarah's last name?

Sarah :

Yes, Hi Buscast. This is Sarah Rosette, co-host of the Wish I'd Known Then podcast. The first podcast I listened to was Rocking Self Publishing with Simon Whistler, who now does YouTube videos, but back in 2014, he interviewed indie authors. I was a mid-list author with a New York publisher, which means I wasn't making much money, but I'd heard about self publishing and that podcast was a masterclass on how to change my business model and go indie. Now I make a nice living writing historical mysteries and it started with that podcast. You can see why I'm such a big fan of podcast. They're amazing. Y'all have a great week.

Jordan:

Sarah, thank you.

Kevin:

Sarah Rosette and she's from the South because she said y'all have a great week, rosette.

Jordan:

Oh, that's awesome I love it, rosette.

Kevin:

that's how we would pronounce it in Jacksonville too, and we say y'all down here as well.

Jordan:

Alban, what should our question for the next episode be?

Alban:

Jordan, can I tell everybody what's happened so far? This bit of the episode has been recorded two days later than all the rest. We ran out of time, but we only really ran out of time because I had no answer for this, and then, when I did come up with an answer, it was actually one that we already did.

Jordan:

You know why we ran out of time was because you and Kevin came into the recording session and then we spent half an hour going through the outline because you guys did it before Whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, wow, throwing around a tax.

Alban:

All of a sudden We also had a big meeting two hours after we started the recording and so we had to both go.

Jordan:

Well, and you guys were busy all of the morning. It was just Tuesday. It was a tight day.

Alban:

There was a lot going on.

Jordan:

Yeah, so we're recording a pickup on Thursday, the day that it's supposed to be finished.

Alban:

Oh, very good use of a podcasting term a pickup.

Jordan:

Thank you.

Alban:

All right. So it took me two days Sound off. Is it good enough to justify two days of thinking about it? But here's my question What's the piece of podcasting equipment or the tool that you use? It could be anything in the workflow, from your microphone to your roadcaster pro to Riverside, to whatever tool you use that. You would be most upset if you could never use it again.

Jordan:

So, to have your response featured on our next episode, leave a 30-second voice message at podinboxcom, slash buzzfraut, send a boost to Graham or tweet the answer to us at BuzzCast podcast. And, as always, thanks for listening and keep podcasting.

Kevin:

You guys remember these things.

Alban:

Oh, you got a little iPod shuffle.

Jordan:

That's not what they looked like when I was in school This before your time. No, this was after my time. The ones that I had didn't have the screen.

Kevin:

Yeah, the first version didn't have a screen. This was a more advanced version. Yeah, those are sweet.

Jordan:

I didn't even know, they still made those.

Kevin:

They don't. This is dug out of a closet.

Jordan:

Oh, it still works.

Kevin:

Yeah, i was impressed. It's still like you can still plug it as long as you got one of these old school cables which everyone does. You can plug it in and it syncs with the latest OS. It's all built into the finder. Now You don't have to go through the music app anymore, Remember? you just have to go through iTunes.

Jordan:

I went through LimeWire.

Kevin:

Yeah, it was a bit of an electronics clean out around here this weekend And I dug that out and my kids are like, oh, i want to use that. That's so cool, so old, how old it is.

Jordan:

Donate to a museum.

Kevin:

What was cool about this was I plugged it in and I was clicking around on the little screen and it has a photos app and you can load up the photos app and there's photos in there that I can't find anywhere else, and so I was like, oh, i wonder if, like, it's just a tiny little thumbnail of the photo or if I can get the full version of it off. There's an option to upload the full version, but I had it turned off at the time. I put all those photos on here. So this is like what do you call it? A double-edged sword? It's like cool that I could see the pictures, but I can only see them this big, ever.

Kevin:

I don't have the originals. I can lost them somehow.

Alban:

I feel like there's a period of photos where you know, the only version I have of them are Facebook, oh well those you can download, Those are that's good Yeah. They don't give you metadata though.

Jordan:

I have a ton of photos on. I used to have a ton of photos on MySpace and then MySpace went through a thing where they like cleaned out all the old profiles and I just lost like so many photos and stuff.

Kevin:

I mean, i guess this happens with every generation. Like, photography is one of those things that just changes generationally. You know, from thousands of years no photographs. Then we started photographs, and then quality gets better and then the formats you have to archive them, whether they be, you know, one print ever, or a negative or a slide, or photo books become a thing, i don't know. It just changes and changes and changes. I have a lot of photos on CDs still and I'm like, oh, that's a safe way to store them for generations. But now, like no computers have CD-ROMs anymore, yeah, i'm like that's not really safe, is it?

Jordan:

I have some of those too. I have some CDs like in a shoebox and I'm like I better get these pictures off at some point because it's going to be obsolete soon.

Kevin:

How many more years until getting a photo off a CD is like getting a VHS tape, you know getting that digitized It won't be long until they're like. Send us your photo CDs and then we'll send it back to you on a cloud link.

Alban:

Those services exist for VHS.

Kevin:

Yeah.

Alban:

The downside is the only photos or VHSs I want digitized are ones that are important enough to me that I'd be really upset if they got lost in the mail or messed up in the process.

Kevin:

Yeah, it is nerve-wracking, right. Yeah, it's your only copy of this on a little camcorder tape or something like that, and you have to send it off to who knows where. Your only recourse if it gets lost is to send an angry email. Yeah, as my sister was asking about that, she wanted to find a local place in Jacksonville to bring it to, because she felt like if they lost it, then at least I can yell at a person face to face and that's going to feel better to her than sending an email.

Jordan:

She can egg their car. All right, we'll eat lunch. Bye.

Alban:

See, you See ya.

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