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Discover Your Podcasting Strengths And Weaknesses

August 18, 2023 Buzzsprout
Discover Your Podcasting Strengths And Weaknesses
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Buzzcast
Discover Your Podcasting Strengths And Weaknesses
Aug 18, 2023
Buzzsprout

Send us a Text Message.

 We're talking about Podcast Movement, and we've got the insider scoop on everything from our plans to the meetup we're hosting for Buzzsprout podcasters. And if that isn't intriguing enough, we're unraveling the mystery of Denver Airport. From gargoyles and secret messages to conspiracy theories about aliens and the New World Order, we're diving headfirst into the enigmatic lore surrounding this locale.

Do you know your strengths and weaknesses as a podcaster? We took the PodScore quiz from PodPros and really loved the results! Then we congratulate Descript and Squadcast for their integration and take a look at podcast tattoos.

View the DISCUSSION THREAD on Twitter/X!

PODCAST MOVEMENT DENVER
We're hosting a Buzzsprout Meetup at Podcast Movement and would love to see you there! To get on the text reminders, text "buzzsprout" to 866-751-3441.

Take a look at the Denver Airport Conspiracies here!

PODSCORE
Alex from Podmatch created a fun quiz called PodScore to give podcasters an idea of what kind of podcaster they are, and ways in which they can improve their podcasting workflow.

PATREON
Patreon has encountered billing & payout issues the last month, but hopefully, they will be resolved soon.
They have also integrated with Spotify's Open Access.

DESCRIPT & SQUADCAST
Congrats to Descript and Squadcast for their recent integration!

PODCAST TATTOOS
Take a look at the tattoos for Canadian Politics is Boring, Crime Junkie, Joe Rogan Experience, and Podcast Movement!
 
📣 SOUND-OFF QUESTION: What is the worst environment you've ever recorded a podcast in?

To have your response featured on our next episode, leave a 30-second voice message at podinbox.com/buzzsprout, send a boostagram, or tweet the answer @BuzzcastPodcast!

PodMatch
PodMatch Automatically Matches Ideal Podcast Guests and Hosts For Interviews

Support the Show.

Contact Buzzcast

Thanks for listening & keep podcasting!

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Support
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Send us a Text Message.

 We're talking about Podcast Movement, and we've got the insider scoop on everything from our plans to the meetup we're hosting for Buzzsprout podcasters. And if that isn't intriguing enough, we're unraveling the mystery of Denver Airport. From gargoyles and secret messages to conspiracy theories about aliens and the New World Order, we're diving headfirst into the enigmatic lore surrounding this locale.

Do you know your strengths and weaknesses as a podcaster? We took the PodScore quiz from PodPros and really loved the results! Then we congratulate Descript and Squadcast for their integration and take a look at podcast tattoos.

View the DISCUSSION THREAD on Twitter/X!

PODCAST MOVEMENT DENVER
We're hosting a Buzzsprout Meetup at Podcast Movement and would love to see you there! To get on the text reminders, text "buzzsprout" to 866-751-3441.

Take a look at the Denver Airport Conspiracies here!

PODSCORE
Alex from Podmatch created a fun quiz called PodScore to give podcasters an idea of what kind of podcaster they are, and ways in which they can improve their podcasting workflow.

PATREON
Patreon has encountered billing & payout issues the last month, but hopefully, they will be resolved soon.
They have also integrated with Spotify's Open Access.

DESCRIPT & SQUADCAST
Congrats to Descript and Squadcast for their recent integration!

PODCAST TATTOOS
Take a look at the tattoos for Canadian Politics is Boring, Crime Junkie, Joe Rogan Experience, and Podcast Movement!
 
📣 SOUND-OFF QUESTION: What is the worst environment you've ever recorded a podcast in?

To have your response featured on our next episode, leave a 30-second voice message at podinbox.com/buzzsprout, send a boostagram, or tweet the answer @BuzzcastPodcast!

PodMatch
PodMatch Automatically Matches Ideal Podcast Guests and Hosts For Interviews

Support the Show.

Contact Buzzcast

Thanks for listening & keep podcasting!

Alban:

It's good name.

Jordan:

It's clever.

Alban:

Can we talk about that a little bit?

Jordan:

We are.

Alban:

Oh, we're talking about it right now. How many times does this happen, jordan, that you've recorded? You and Kevin are doing the show and I'm just over here, like that's a great topic. We should 100% bring that up.

Jordan:

Man, when this episode comes out. In a few days, we're going to be in Denver for podcast movement, which I'm so excited about. We gave away a lot of tickets to podcast movement. How many do we end up giving away, AlbAn?

Alban:

We've given away 30 tickets. We bought 30 to give away, oh my gosh, and we have people on the waiting list. There is a bit of me that I've already started looking at. What would it take for us to get those people to come as well? It might be more than 30, but there's a big group of us going. That's really the best part for us.

Alban:

I think whenever I talk to other people who work in marketing, they're like oh, you go to conferences and you take people and you do all this stuff. What's the ROI on this? I'm like oh, conferences for us are all about getting to connect with people. Because setting up the booth and trying to sell your software and do the sales thing, I've never been able to make it work. Other people might make it work, but we don't, especially when Buzzsprout is $12.

Alban:

If it was a big ticket item it might make more sense, but the real benefit is you go and you get to have so many cool conversations with people whose lives you've made a little bit easier. They would probably got their podcast online with somebody else, but when they tell you oh, it was really painful when I was with this company and now I'm with you and it's less painful. That's a really wonderful thing to hear, and so we love being able to take people, because that's a few more people that we get to come alongside them and support their podcast a little bit more, and we get to also have a ton of fun with them.

Jordan:

It's really fun to finally meet people in person. It's such a different experience than just talking through Twitter or like Instagrams or email. It's just completely different, and the last couple of times I've gone to a podcast movement, I have made such good friends. It's really cool People that I talk to for years afterwards and I will call constantly, even though they're not even in the same side of the country as me, and I'm really looking forward to that. But we're attending some of the parties at podcast movement. We're attending some events there. So, Alban, which ones should people attend if they want to see us there?

Alban:

Podcast movement this year is really from Tuesday to Thursday. Tuesday and Wednesday are the really big days. You want to be there all day, every day. Tuesday, wednesday, thursday runs till about two to five, depending if you want to stay late, but those are the times like the real conference is happening. But with all conferences there's stuff that happens kind of like the day before for people to show up early, and stuff that happens a little bit like the day after for people who stick around. We will all be showing up on Monday and I think the only thing we're really going to be doing is setting up our booth in the trade show room and probably we'll do dinner as a team. But I don't think we will go do a ton of stuff that night.

Alban:

On Tuesday we will hang out at the Buzzsprout booth all day. Tom is giving a talk about podcast statistics, what they can teach you and what they cannot teach you, how to use them in a healthy way. He talks a lot about things we've talked about before what's your measure of success and how do you evaluate your podcast? That will be at noon on the technical stage, which is in the expo hall. That night we're going to have a meetup for everybody who's on Buzzsprout and everybody we took.

Alban:

That's going to be at the Mountain Pass Sports Bar, which is in the hotel, and one of the nice things there is, if you're in the Denver area but you don't go to the media, but you don't go to podcast movement, you'll still be able to go to the meetup. Oh cool, so you won't have to show your badge. I think really all we're going to do is we will get a corner of that restaurant and we will have a bunch of drinks and food there, and all you need to do is show up and walk over and now you're part of the group. So hopefully we have a bunch of people who come and hang out. Those are really some of the most fun times we ever have.

Jordan:

I know last year we had a group that people could join for text messaging and stuff like that. Are we doing something similar? That was kind of hard to put together last year, wasn't it?

Alban:

Everything's harder the first time and a lot easier the second time, so we are going to have that again. I set up a text number. If you text Buzzsprout to 866-751-3441, then you'll be added to the list. That number again, is 866-751-3441. Just text Buzzsprout or click the link in the show notes. I'll put it down there. Hang on, I'm going to do it real time. What is it? Just text the code Buzzsprout, that's B-U-Z-Z-S-P-R-O-U-T, to 866-751-3441. That number again, Kevin, is 866-751-3441.

Kevin:

Why do we have to text the code Buzzsprout? If I text like hello, that won't work. I don't know.

Alban:

Here's the thing All these texting things. There's so many features you can set up, you can have short codes, but then it's like, yeah, it's just $1,000 a month to have a short code. So you text like Buzz to 3221 or something. Well, yeah, that's a cool thing, but we're definitely not going to do that. For the Buzzsprout meetup I have a $1,000 code. This is like a $20.

Alban:

And the real benefit here is I've already written all these reminders for each of these events and just say, hey, we're going to be doing this and if anything changes, we have an easy way to communicate that and if people have questions, then they can text back and I will get all of those texts. So we did this at PodFest last year and Jonathan set it up and it was so useful because we just ran into people had issues with tickets or some people weren't able to come to the party and then they wanted to know where people were going afterward and Jonathan was on his phone just responding and it made it super easy for everybody to kind of stay on the same page, Yep.

Kevin:

Well, I just did it and it worked. I got my confirmation text back. It says you're signed up, looking forward to meeting you at podcast movement Reply.

Jordan:

Stop to cancel Did you do Buzzsprout, or did you just do hi?

Kevin:

I did Buzzsprout because that's what he told me to do, but now I kind of want to test it. Just random words I need another phone though.

Jordan:

I got a phone.

Kevin:

No, don't give me that number again the wrong thing 866-751-3441.

Jordan:

All right, I'm testing it with hi.

Alban:

Hi doesn't work. What's happening Jordan?

Jordan:

Absolutely nothing. I just texted hi and I'm probably going to get.

Kevin:

So it must just be a generic number that they're looking for, a keyword to figure out which group you want to join. You should type in something crazy Just put in pickle balls, see if you get added to a pickle ball.

Jordan:

No, I almost did it. All right, I'm going to do Buzzsprout. You have to do Buzzsprout.

Kevin:

Buzzsprout worked. Yeah, got to do Buzzsprout. You know what we should do, Alban? Real-time marketing meeting. Real-time marketing meeting. We should ask somebody from our tech team to pull an email list for us. If anybody who has a Colorado billing address for their Buzzsprout account and shoot them an email and say whether you're coming to podcast moving or not, you can come to our meetup.

Alban:

I think that is a wonderful idea. I put it in the newsletter and I was surprised by the relatively few people that actually wrote back. But yeah, I agree, that's a great idea.

Kevin:

That's how we do marketing.

Jordan:

Oh, I'm looking forward to Wednesday. I'm looking at this right now. I'm excited.

Alban:

Sorry, I'm just trying to write down Kevin's marketing.

Kevin:

He was capturing the minutes from our marketing meeting.

Alban:

Okay, all right, so we'll have the Buzzsprout meetup and for anybody who wants. After that, wondery is throwing a party, and so we will migrate over to the Wondery party. On Wednesday we will again be at the expo hall. I think Tom is going to be a guest on the new media show live, so that will be at 4.30.

Kevin:

I didn't know that. That's a spicy show. They're always arguing on there. It's kind of like going on one of those political talk shows where they always argue with each other.

Alban:

What was the one used to be called Crossfire?

Kevin:

Crossfire yeah.

Alban:

Where they just got the most argumentative people, until I think John Stewart was the one who kind of killed it because he went on. He just wouldn't give in. He's just like this is really bad for our democracy. And they're like oh yeah, Okay. So Tom's going on podcast crossfire, the new media show live. He will be doing that at 4.30 to 5.15. That's in the expo hall and podcast movement this year because it's in Denver and Jordan. You're closer to Denver so you'd probably notice Denver is known for a lot of breweries and so they're having Denver beer movement where a bunch of people in the expo hall will have beers to give out and people will go by and I think you'd have a bartender and we have two beers at the Busbrow booth that are both local to Denver.

Jordan:

What do we have? Do you know?

Alban:

I do because I was the one who picked them. They better not be IPAs. They're not IPAs. Kevin knows that I'm now allergic to the yeast in IPAs. Yeah, it's dangerous. I got a left hand milk stout that sounds good. Sounds a little heavy. I really like it. It's heavy but it tastes great and it was something that was like different. That wasn't an IPA.

Kevin:

It feels like a dessert beer. It's the end of the night. Come hang out at Busbrow and chill with your dessert beer.

Jordan:

Yeah, like eat it with like chocolate cake or something.

Kevin:

We should get cookies. You should have your milk stout with cookies. That's such a good idea.

Alban:

Okay, that's a great idea. Another marketing meeting. We do need to get cookies. Okay, add that to the marketing meeting notes. And then I wanted to get something that was on brand for Busbrow, kevin. There's something called the Silver Bullet of Beards. Do you know what this is, kevin? Oh, yeah, I do. It's Coors Light man. Coors Light, cold as the Rockies. Yeah, it's a local brewery.

Kevin:

It's my favorite. You know it's cold because the can turns blue.

Jordan:

Which is really fun.

Alban:

Isn't there a thing? They brew it cold as if, like beer, didn't warm up and cool down like everything else in the world.

Jordan:

It's something like they can it cold Like.

Kevin:

Yeah, they brew it cold, they keep it cold. It never goes warm till it goes in your belly. Except for when it sits in like the back of the gas station you shouldn't be buying from that gas station.

Alban:

Well, anyway, everything was like craft beer and I was like you know, a lot of people don't really love craft beer and I was like, ooh, coors Light, I'm getting that. So that was a. It was an Albert Brooks selection. That's a good local beer, I like it. And then that night is the I Heart Party and I Heart. They at some point decided we are going to just throw a massive fun party every podcast movement. And last year we went. I think Paris Hilton was the DJ.

Jordan:

That was two years ago. Was that Evolutions?

Alban:

Oh, it was really that two years ago.

Jordan:

Yeah, it was the one I missed. I was so sad.

Kevin:

Yeah, I never saw her, so that must have been Evolutions, which I don't go to.

Alban:

Yeah, and the one before that was Questlove. Yes, was the DJ, and Al Pete, just like, walked backstage and met him.

Jordan:

Oh did he.

Alban:

Yeah.

Jordan:

Of course Al did that.

Alban:

I mean, every year they have like a big party and a bunch of cool people go, so you don't have to go and drink, but you can go and dance and see a cool show. Do you have to dance? You don't have to, but if you're not drinking and you're not dancing, all you're doing is listening to loud music, and I don't love the loud music on its own.

Kevin:

I feel like the other things are really what you're there for my jam is to go to these parties and find a quiet corner and hang out in the quiet corner.

Jordan:

They had some of those last year. There was, you remember, that like side room and it was like an arcade and like ping pong tables and that was kind of like where the people hung out that were like too cool to be in the club area.

Kevin:

Maybe we're not too cool, maybe we're just not into, you know, drinking and dancing and loud music. Maybe that's all right. Maybe we don't need to be judged for that.

Alban:

I'm not judging, I'm saying that probably going to a loud club environment if you don't like loud music or drinking or dancing probably isn't what you want to do.

Kevin:

Well, maybe you try to tell the people you're with it's not really my thing, I don't think I'll go tonight. And then everyone's like, oh, come on, we have to go, and then it's where you go. I'm just saying hypothetically, this could be how some of these people end up there and they don't really want to be there.

Alban:

And then the last day, kevin. What are you going to do? You've got some plans, right?

Kevin:

Yeah, I'm out of there on Thursday, so no conference for me on Thursday. I'm heading up to the mountains of Colorado. Kevin's going to be off-road motorcycling. It's hard to go to Colorado and not do something outdoors for me, so is it just you? Tom and I and Ron, who's also a member of our team and now lives in Colorado. We're all going to meet up and we're grabbing some off-road motorcycles and heading into the mountains for a couple of days.

Jordan:

Oh, that's going to be so awesome.

Kevin:

Yeah, I'm excited about that.

Jordan:

Alba and I will be taking down the booth.

Kevin:

Yeah, sorry about that. I didn't see what time my plane leaves, so I'll work extra hard on the setup, since I won't be there for the tear down.

Alban:

I practiced once. So somebody had set the booth up in the office. Oh, we did last week and broke it down and packed it up myself and it was super easy. So it's not a big deal and I also was able to figure out. There's tons of shipping options. So we're just going to ship back a handful of things from the conference, but everyone listening is probably not as interested in our shipping plans as much as those other plans. So Tuesday night is the BuzzFrog meetup. We would love to see you there. You could go to either of Tom's talks, the talk on podcast stats, or his appearance on podcast Crossfire with Todd Cochran. We have to rebrand that show and we really hope to meet everybody. You can sign up for the text list in the description or you can click the link and we will see you there and we'll have a ton of fun. Yeah.

Kevin:

So before we wrap this segment, we have to talk about the Gaylord Rockies resort. It is sold out.

Jordan:

It is sold out, which is wild. That's a huge resort.

Kevin:

It's huge.

Jordan:

I actually have a theory about why this podcast movement is going to be so heavily attended.

Alban:

What is the theory?

Jordan:

Have you heard about the Denver Airport?

Alban:

Oh, it has. There's some like Denver Airport conspiracy theory. Oh, I haven't heard it. Let me hear. Do I want to know this before I fly into it?

Jordan:

I think this just confirms that the Padoominati is a real thing.

Alban:

I've never got about that.

Jordan:

I actually really do think that this is why podcast movement is more heavily attended, not because there's like some weird podcast Illuminati theory thing going on, but I think that a lot of podcasters who are in the true crime conspiracy kind of genre I think they would go out of their way to like record live in the airport. I think you're going to see like a lot of people with cameras and microphones in the airport. So this is actually from the Denver International Airport's website. They have a page of the conspiracies. Do you want to hear some of them?

Kevin:

Yeah, I do.

Alban:

I don't know any of these, you can't tell your own conspiracy theory, right? Isn't part of the conspiracy theory to keep it quiet?

Kevin:

No, you don't want to keep it quiet. You want to let people know, you want to open their eyes.

Jordan:

Well, there's so many conspiracies around the airport that they're just finally like we're like, we'll embrace this.

Alban:

No, no, no. But if the airport's the one doing the conspiracies, they're not hide it.

Jordan:

No, because this is them saying that the reality, like they're doing, like conspiracy reality, I'm not going to read the reality because that's boring. We're just reading the conspiracies here.

Alban:

Okay.

Jordan:

This is their full scoop on Denver's Wildest Rumors. So the first one is the New World Order built the airport, and Alien execs are having a conference meeting down below, and that's why the airport's so big.

Alban:

I'm sorry, can I just? Say if Kevin was like hey guys, I just posted something in the company like software so everyone can read it. There's been a rumor we've been acquired by Google and Steve Jobs isn't dead. He's going to run Buzzsprout Like that's not true, then I'd be like that actually sounds more likely to be true now than I ever thought it was beforehand. Right, like you can't just come out with a random this, definitely this, this random thing isn't true.

Kevin:

Well, if no one's saying it, like if no one Ever said anything about what is this? Aliens having meetings underneath the Denver Airport and then, all of a sudden, denver airport's like denying this rumor that no one has ever said before.

Jordan:

So here's the thing is that the airport was built for like a billion dollars over the original budget and they actually like built this whole section of it that's like entirely unused, and so people have all these theories that's like maybe like a military bunker, or there's like some secret stuff, like alien stuff going on underneath it. So that's kind of the basis on this New World Order having a conference with aliens beneath it.

Kevin:

I don't know a whole lot about the New World Order, except that they were, weren't they? A tag team wrestling group for a while in the 90s.

Alban:

Yeah, I thought that was a wrestling thing. Yeah.

Kevin:

These two wrestlers have really they're very influential, evidently.

Alban:

Yeah, they come up in a lot of conspiracy podcasts They've been meeting with aliens.

Jordan:

All right. Next one Mustang. A beautiful statue is cursed, referred to as Blucifer or their names we can't print. Mustang is believed to be cursed due to it falling on the artist in 2006. This occurred two years before it was installed at Denver.

Alban:

So what Wait?

Kevin:

is that true?

Jordan:

It that horse fell on the, on the artist that created it killed the artist that created it, and so it's like curse no way, I did not know that 100% cursed. Yeah, and so it's like this huge blue Mustang with like bright red eyes, and so people call it Blucifer, so you might see that the airport.

Kevin:

You definitely will see, that for sure.

Alban:

A marble blue rock statue with red eyes. First off, someone thought that was a good idea. Yeah, and it killed the artist by falling on it and everyone's saying that's definitely not cursed, that's 100. I don't even believe in curses and I believe in that curse. That's definitely real.

Jordan:

Okay, next up, denver has extra tri-strile map coordinates. These coordinates, given to the humans by the aliens in Spielberg's close encounters of the third kind, take you to the Denver International Airport.

Kevin:

Did you type those coordinates into like Google Maps?

Jordan:

Let's test this out right now.

Kevin:

Do it Okay, let's debunk this.

Jordan:

Oh, control, c, control Z yeah.

Alban:

That's true.

Jordan:

So it's the Denver Airport.

Alban:

When was the Denver Airport built?

Jordan:

1995. It opened.

Alban:

And close encounters of the third kind from the 80s right 77. So close encounters of the third kind is 18 years older than the Denver Airport and it's at the same coordinates.

Jordan:

Oh, you know what? Actually, the coordinates land 51 miles northwest of the airport. So it's Wait a second Wait, wait, wait wait, unless it's including that underground alien bunker.

Alban:

Jordan, I love that. We just back checked it. How did you end up 51 miles away and go? Yep, got it.

Jordan:

That's it. What am I? A cartographer, I don't know.

Alban:

Cartographer, I thought you.

Jordan:

Cartographer.

Kevin:

Cartographer Map maker. It's in the vicinity. I think we'll label that as plausible.

Jordan:

Plausible. Okay, Next one we have Denver. Gargoyles are sinister. The Gargoyles are evil and point to all indications of a new world order. So in this airport there's a bunch of Gargoyles around. For some reason.

Alban:

They're leaning into this heavily. I feel like this is just the Denver Airport pushing this now, because why are you making a giant blue horse with red eyes and Gargoyles part of the aesthetic for your airport? That doesn't make any sense.

Jordan:

That one's kind of weird, Okay, Secret messages are inscribed on the floor. The writing's on the floor Augh augh, like a-u-a-g. The inscription on the floor of the Great Hall is the abbreviation for the deadly toxin, Australia antigen, which is said to be the Illuminati's secret weapon to accomplish the genocide. I don't, I don't know.

Kevin:

You're going off the rails a little bit.

Jordan:

Yeah, that's a little bit Okay. This is the last one that they have listed. Denver is very connected, and not just to airline destinations. The airport tunnels are connected to the Cheyenne Mountain, the home of NORAD, north American Aerospace Defense Command, thus creating a 120-mile escape route to survival bunkers.

Kevin:

See Well, that just makes good sense. Yeah, that just makes good sense 120 miles underground. Yeah.

Alban:

It's a long tunnel. I don't know about any of that. Well, I think I'll put most of these in the probably true category. You know, we've done our due diligence. We searched the coordinates for one of these.

Kevin:

One of the great things about the Gaylord Rockies Resort is it's like five minutes from the airport. To bring it back on topic, even though that resort is sold out, it's nice that it's so close to the airport because there's tons of other perfectly fine hotels right around the area, like probably I don't know it's pretty hot Summertime. I wouldn't say maybe walking distance, but like under $10 Uber distance from the Gaylord Rockies Resort.

Jordan:

So it could be that hot in Colorado, is it?

Kevin:

Yeah, colorado's hot. It's like super close to the sun, it's up there. That's why the aliens put it there.

Jordan:

Okay, this is kind of a fun one. Did you guys do your pod score quiz?

Kevin:

No, should I do it now?

Jordan:

You can. It says it takes 28 minutes but it did not take me 28 minutes. I got through it pretty quickly. Our friend Alex from Podmatch and Podpros. He created a fun quiz called PodScore to give podcasters an idea of what kind of podcaster they are and ways in which they can improve their podcasting workflow. So I took the quiz and I got the workflow wonder kind and it said that I excel in the area of organization and processes for the podcast and mostly produces stress-free pace, and I feel like that's actually pretty accurate. The cool thing about this quiz that actually really appreciated is that it also created like a very highly detailed report and giving me scores on different aspects. There's like four pages of this report and it's really easy to see areas in which you can improve your podcasting workflow or just the way that you market your podcast, things like that and Alex did a really great job of providing some tips and links to improve in those areas that you struggle in. I thought it was actually very well done.

Alban:

So your organization was your top. What is the area that you can improve on the most? What was your lowest score?

Jordan:

Funny enough, my lowest score was growth and monetization strategy, since I feel like that's my area. But the problem is that I'm all about the like organic growth and so I love the word of mouth and I'm not very good at certain marketing techniques like YouTube, social media, things like that, so I'm sure I got lowest scores on that because I was kind of in the I don't care about marketing. So, yeah, I scored pretty low there.

Alban:

What's interesting is that's an area I feel like you have succeeded in, Even if you're not doing maybe some of the best practices. Your show is like 11 million downloads. That's a pretty successful show.

Jordan:

Yeah, but I mean, if you're looking at it from a quiz perspective, if I'm marking all these things like no, I'm not doing that, not doing that, not doing that, you know, I think that getting lucky and doing well probably doesn't score very well as far as my techniques for growth.

Kevin:

I think that's absolutely true. So I just started taking this and, okay, this is like seriously impressive. This is a fantastic little survey question thing and I don't want to blow through it because it's so good. So I only got to 31% complete. I'm gonna stop and finish it after we're done recording, but this is really well put together, well thought out, like what I'm noticing already is not only is it asking you questions about who you are and how you podcast, but at the same time, but like probably giving a lot of good ideas about other things you could be doing.

Alban:

Mm-hmm.

Jordan:

Yes.

Alban:

And so the way this all came about was Alex was Individually meeting with something like 1600 podcasters Whoa and was trying to figure out what are the things they're all doing, what are the common denominators for the podcast that do well, because, honestly, podcasting is a long-term game, not a short-term game, and so you're trying to optimize for sticking with it, and so these are all the areas for Podcast success. Then what they do is the report is not just telling you where you score, but it's also saying do you want to take like a little mini course on the areas that you could improve? Oh, okay, and so, kevin, I think Jordan actually shared her results. If you click into it, you can see here's an area you excel at and here's a few things you could consider. Here's an area where maybe it's not your bread and butter. Here a few things you can try so that you're finding areas where you have a lot of leverage to improve the show, and then other areas where you go.

Alban:

Oh, you know what I'm really good at my podcast workflow. Now, when I go to podcast movement, I probably don't need to go to another podcast workflow talk. Maybe what would be best for me would be to look at Jordan, you said that one of your lower ones was marketing and you could say okay, I think I want to learn a little bit more about the marketing stuff. So now I'm gonna look at that area as an area for improvement. So it's not just a quiz. This isn't telling you which Disney Princess you are. This is telling you you're this type of podcaster and here actionable ways to improve. So very cool. I love that Alex does these things that are like Extremely ambitious as marketing and they're like just kind of these standalone tools that are really valuable. So very cool, alex and his team, for putting this together. I'm excited to see how this works for everybody.

Kevin:

Yeah, I gotta say I was not expecting to be as impressed as I am. This is amazing, so I look forward to taking some time and playing with it when we get done recording, but it's it's too intense to just blow through it right now. So if you want to check it out, give yourself a few minutes. I don't know at 28 minutes, what was it? Is that the estimate 28 minutes?

Jordan:

Yeah, so the estimate wise.

Kevin:

I think I did mine in like seven minutes yeah that feels about right, probably less than 10, but if you want to like go through it slowly, to write ideas down as you're working through it Maybe give yourself the full half hour.

Jordan:

Yeah, there's some really cool stuff Listed in the options. I was like I haven't heard of that and I need to look into it. So, yeah, definitely take time to go through this, because it was a lot of fun and very informative. Patreon do you want the bad news or the good news first?

Alban:

I think normally I'm a bad news first person. What are you, kevin?

Kevin:

Yeah, I'm probably bad news first, perfect. And then what I do is I hear the good news and I turn that into bad news too. That's bad news.

Alban:

Yeah, once you've got the bad news, the good news doesn't even phase you, and if you know there's bad news coming, you just don't even pay attention to the good. The good news is definitely ruined by the bad news. I think, all right, give us the bad news.

Jordan:

Well, the bad news for a lot of patreon creators is that patreon changes billing from California to Dublin, ireland and a lot of people were being hit with like foreign transaction fees and it was flagging credit card charges for the patreon subscribers and Declining a whole bunch of payments.

Jordan:

Oh on reddit. I mean, I was kind of going through this for a little bit and there was a bunch of people like there's this one guy that said why did I suddenly lose 300 patrons? And then someone else said it's day three of me losing an average of ten patrons daily. Someone else said I also lost over 300 and I'm still down like 150 compared to last month. So oh, oh my gosh yeah, a bunch of creators, and I actually looked at mine and I lost 150 dollars.

Alban:

No way, mm-hmm, is this a move by patreon to move to. You know like Apple is supposedly like their headquartered in Ireland or something like something about their corporate structures based in Ireland, and it's because a lot of corporate taxes.

Kevin:

Yeah, there are some tax advantages to doing business in Ireland.

Alban:

Yeah, is that what patreon is doing? That they moved it to Ireland?

Jordan:

No, I think it's the company that they're they use for the transactions, like I think they. I want to say that they used to use like stripe or something like that, and then they switched to another company and that company's based in Ireland is my understanding of it.

Jordan:

So, yeah, a lot of people are really hurting from losing their members. And then on August 2nd they also had a creator payout issue with Payoneer and they temporarily disabled all payouts and so the creators on patreon couldn't withdraw the money that they had because patreon like disabled it, and A couple days later they said it was resolved. But I am still seeing people posting to like reddit and Twitter and just being like why can I not get my money out of PayPal?

Kevin:

Not PayPal, patreon.

Jordan:

Sorry, yeah, patreon.

Kevin:

Yeah, so. Has patreon responded publicly to any of these issues?

Jordan:

They're posting like a couple updates and just basically saying that they're currently investigating the issue and they'll be resolved soon.

Alban:

So they're not super active in posting updates man, that is really tough, especially when you're you know it's not like you've changed anything yourself and if you're working on patreon and you're a content creator, you're really hoping on growing the amount of active patrons that you have. And if you start losing 10 a day, that's probably just a bunch of credit cards that are failing and I don't know what the percent is. Some percent of those failed credit cards. They didn't never reactivated. It's not because the person doesn't like your content, it's just that they're like uh, it failed, I'm not worried about it and they just move on. And so, yeah, that's tough as a creator to lose that and to see eventually some of them might not ever come back.

Kevin:

Yeah, it's. It's surprising how quickly I can go from this is something I really want to buy or Support or donate to, and then how quickly I'm like, yeah, it's not worth it when something you know becomes difficult in the checkout process. So, whether it just be something simple that I'm like, oh, I might impulse purchase this thing I just saw online and then like, if they don't take Apple pay and I don't have my wallet on me, like I don't have my credit card number memorized, I'm out, like I'm not gonna, yeah, and I never think about it then. Or I've had a membership to this and I won't go into what it's for, but I've had this membership thing for years and years and years. It just runs. It's like a triple-a service, but for the water anyway, it just runs and runs.

Kevin:

And I think my credit card, like I put it in like six years ago. I've been paying for it every year for six years. I'm perfectly happy with it. I just got an email the other day about your credit card expired. I'm like I'm not gonna put in a new credit card and I have no problem with the service. It's kind of like an insurance thing, but I've never used it and so I'm like, yeah, if it would have bought over a nude, I would have kept it, no problem.

Kevin:

But now I gotta put my number in again. I'm not gonna do that. But so but but for? If your livelihood is dependent upon All these people who have signed up and supported your creative efforts for one reason or another, a lot of them might feel that way. They still like you, but maybe they're not just listening to it as much or they're not as into it. They're happy to keep supporting you as long as it's easy for them, but as soon as it becomes a little bit challenging and difficult, oh, that's, that's tough that all these creators are gonna potentially lose a big chunk of their revenue.

Jordan:

All right. So on to the good news Patreon is now working with Spotify's open access, so they've finally integrated with Spotify. And I'm a little bit salty about this, because I had Patreon like right out of the gate when I started my podcast and it was such a bummer because I kept losing Patreon members because it didn't integrate with Spotify and most of my audience is like Spotify heavy right, and so then I had to sign up with Supercast because Supercast was working with Spotify Right when they started the open access program, and so it's been two years since then and now patreon is finally working with Spotify, which is really great for a lot of podcasters. If you have a patreon feed and you want to sync it with Spotify, then you can just go to your settings in the podcast audio tab and you turn on the sync. Here's the thing about Spotify's open access. That's a little bit of a pain If you have a Supercast memberful glow, one of those like Spotify open access. What's what I'm looking for?

Jordan:

solutions, solutions, yeah, platforms that you work with, it will create another podcast. So what happens is when you have, like, let's say, my Supercast, it created a separate podcast for that premium feed. So if you also want to integrate your patron members on Spotify, it will create a third podcast. So probably just stick to the ones that you already have if you're already in there, but yeah, it'll create a different one completely. But something cool that Spotify is doing is they have added a paid podcast Promotion banner, which I'm very excited about because Apple podcast does this best route, has this, and it's really nice having that banner on your podcast page. So I was able to go into the Spotify for podcasters dashboard and so in your podcast settings you can click to add a banner and then on your regular feed it has a banner for the premium content. It says exclusive episodes for subscribers and I'll take you to the paid podcast and is that feature specific to patreon or could?

Jordan:

that would work fine if you're using Supercast or Supporting cast, or yeah when you have these premium feeds that are synced up with Spotify, it actually will like add the extra premium podcast to your Spotify dashboard. So, basically, I have two podcasts in there it's my regular one and then my premium one and so, yeah, it links to any of those.

Kevin:

So if you click through on that banner that it puts on your free show and then you start following the page show or subscribing to it, are you then following two separate podcasts or does it combine them?

Jordan:

you're following two, though I do have my regular episodes also syncing into Supercast, just so it's like one full feed. So I have that going to. So it's a lot of hoops to jump through.

Kevin:

The way you have your podcast set up. You have a free feed and that just gets all the free episodes. You have a premium feed which has the free episodes and the premium ones, right? So if somebody ends up subscribing to your show through Spotify or anywhere else, what they should probably do is then like unfollow the free version, right?

Jordan:

Yeah, that's what they would do and I like that.

Kevin:

I think that's like the most logical way to do it.

Jordan:

But it is. It is kind of pain the butt to be juggling all these things. I really wish that Spotify would just do the RSS import. But and it's it's funny because they don't get a cut of your premium subscription, so I don't know why they don't just do that.

Kevin:

It's very weird why they don't just what?

Jordan:

just let you import RSS feeds. I just I don't understand it Like they're creating so much more work that it's worth.

Alban:

Yeah, I remember Some people were saying, oh, spotify open access is so much better than Apple podcast subscriptions because All sorts of different companies can integrate with it, and I was like, well, it's actually in the middle of two things that Apple provides. Apple provides Apple podcast subscriptions, where they will Sell your content on your behalf and they will keep a percent, but the rest goes back to you. The other thing they offer is any podcast feed can be added into Apple podcasts, no matter what. It can be. Stuff that's not in their library. It can be a feed that's unique to you because you paid and got a unique RSS feed. So Apple, kind of I feel like, is in this perfect area where they, on one side, are Completely embracing the open podcasting ecosystem and all the cool things that are with RSS, and they're also saying, hey, but if you want an all-in-one solution to help sell premium content, boom, we've got Apple podcast subscriptions.

Alban:

Spotify because and I, you know, still struggle to understand exactly why they've done it this way but they've never allowed a random RSS feed to be added to Spotify, so you couldn't just listen to your paid podcast subscription just because you have that feed. Well, obviously the downside there is, if anybody like Buzzsprout subscriptions. If we want to be able to integrate, we have to go build a whole integration with Spotify. But with Apple people can just add that RSS feed into their Apple podcast app or they can add to overcast or any other podcast app. I think Spotify is the only one who's held this line. We don't want to have open, just random RSS feeds added into your queue. So right. Do you have a theory for why they've done that, kevin?

Kevin:

No Um control or something. Yeah, we've met with Spotify a couple times about it. They have their reasons. I don't know that we want to go into all of that or that they'd want us to go into all of that, but they do have their reasons. But they're not in the best interest. I would say this they're not in the best interest of podcasters Like you should be able to any podcast app you use at any time. You should be able to just paste it in RSS feed and use it as a player. It's kind of like um, I don't know, you're paying, you bought a record player but it only plays certain records like approved by the person you bought the record player from. That's weird.

Alban:

Don't you have like a printer that's like this? Kevin, you have a printer that only prints. If you use like the ink that you bought, you can only get the ink, yeah.

Kevin:

I used to have that printer. It's now. Yeah, it was donated to Goodwill, so somebody has that printer now, but I don't. But yeah, I mean that should be like a table stakes feature of a podcast player. Right, you should be able to hit add a podcast and then you can search for one and it would search through the directories. But if you can't find it, but you know the RSS feed, you should just be able to add by RSS and paste in your RSS feed and just plays it. Spotify doesn't do that and as long as they don't, then adding premium content in the Spotify always has to go through their system and it's not super easy to do the integration and even after you do the integration, it's still a little bit cumbersome for management of all that, and that's what Jordan's talking about. But yeah, I don't know how to land that plane other than Spotify is Spotify.

Jordan:

There was a little bit of breaking news this morning, so we don't know a whole lot about it, but Descript, which is the video audio editor tool that so many people use, has now acquired Squadcast, which is a remote recording studio, so it's kind of exciting.

Alban:

Yeah, I remember the day that Squadcast launched. We were in podcast movement. La and Brian and I were just around the corner from the Squadcast team and we went over there and met Zach and Rock, who are the two founders, and it's cool to kind of see in their journey. They built some stuff that at the time I think really not many people were trying to record audio or video in the browser and it's awesome that they were able to do that. And now they are joining a much larger team in Descript. Again, we don't know a ton about it because it came out this morning, but congratulations to everybody involved. I know that Ariel at Squadcast is going to do some kind of town hall, so everybody who uses those products will have a little bit more knowledge, probably by the time this is out about. What does this mean for pricing? What does this mean for development? Does this all become one tool in the future? Does this stay separate? I'm sure all of that will come out pretty soon, but congrats to all of our friends in the podcasting industry.

Kevin:

Yeah that's fantastic. It seemed to make a lot of sense to me. I mean, descript has been an editor that a lot of people have used for audio for a long time. They've more recently been focusing a lot on video, but I don't think they've had any solutions for capturing like a remote recording on both sides, and at the same time, riverside has been pushing a lot into this area. So Riverside launching as a way to do remote audio and video recordings and now have expanded their tool set to include some editing, and so I think there's the competition like keeping things in feature parity with each other, so they're true competitors. I'm sure this makes a lot of sense for Descript to be able to have the remote recording side as well as part of their solution. So now we've got a couple of really great options, whether you're a Descript person and want to use Squadcast to do your remote recording or you like Riverside and they're building out the editing side. Great solutions on either side and congratulations to all involved.

Alban:

And if you, really love any of these tools. You might like this next segment, which is about podcasting tattoos. Apparently, a bunch of people and they really love content decide to get tattoos of it, so we need to see the first person who has a Squadcast, riverside or Descript tattoo Jordan. What's going on in this story?

Jordan:

Oh man, I saw this in pod news and thought it was so funny. The Canadian Politics is Boring podcast. I'm not saying that Canadian Politics is boring. We talked about this once and I had someone from, I believe, nova Scotia message me and say it's not boring and I was like no, like I was saying the podcast name. So I want to be really clear.

Alban:

There's quotes around it. The quotes start at Canadian and it goes all the way to the end of boring Canadian Politics is. Boring is the name of the show.

Jordan:

Yeah. So this podcast, canadian Politics is Boring, has gained quite a listenership, and they recently came up with an idea to turn their listeners into advertisements, and so they're paying their listeners to have their artwork tattooed on their body. I don't know what the return on investment for a tattoo would be, because how much does a tattoo cost? Like a couple hundred bucks, so that's. That's cheaper than a billboard.

Kevin:

Yeah, probably, and it's there forever. Well, are they paying them above the tattoo cost? I don't know, probably.

Alban:

Yeah. Is it just a reimbursement for the tattoo or is there an additional like amount being paid?

Jordan:

I don't know. I tried looking into it how much they're being paid, but I couldn't find any information on it. But someone did do it.

Kevin:

Well, I mean, did you email them and offer to get the tattoo and try to negotiate a deal for yourself?

Jordan:

No.

Kevin:

I don't know.

Jordan:

This is not the tattoo I would get.

Kevin:

I feel like the size would matter, the size of the tattoo and the placement, Like if you're going to get it, you know, like on your forehead. Obviously that's going to pay a lot more than a back tattoo.

Alban:

Yeah, that's much more than a back tattoo.

Jordan:

I'm picturing, like you know, how the butchers have, like the meat cut graphs. Yeah, I'm picturing that, except for like a person, but there's like prices on the different parts.

Alban:

Yeah, that's their media kit. The forearm is a choice piece. It's a choice placement. I'm also seeing Jord, you've pulled in other ones.

Jordan:

It made me curious. I was like what other podcasts have had their listeners get tattoos of the podcast?

Alban:

So what we've got a Joe Rogan one here Is this from. Is this Joe Rogan who got the Joe Rogan tattoo.

Jordan:

No, it's a listener who, so I did some Googling. If you Google like podcast tattoo, you'll just come up with like tattoo podcasts. So I had to like think, okay, what podcasts are big enough that they would have people? Get a tattoo. So I had a rabbit hole a little bit here. But yeah, the Joe Rogan podcast the listener has like his weird, like face thing in a circle On their forearm.

Alban:

Miniacal grin like with a third eye.

Jordan:

Yeah, it's just it looks so creepy.

Alban:

It is a creepy artwork.

Jordan:

It is. And then Crime Junkie has one and someone has be weird, be rude, stay alive, which is kind of like their catch phrase. So they've gotten that. And then, yeah, the Canadian politics is boring one. They're literally like out of a, I assume, like a canned salmon. It's tuna, like the two of them. If you've ever seen this, it's tuna yeah, it's tuna. Okay, so like the two hosts popping out of a tuna can? It's so ugly.

Kevin:

But did you notice the show artwork is a little bit different than the tattoo?

Jordan:

Yeah, so I think the tattoo is better.

Kevin:

The tattoo is cool. But if you look at the podcast artwork, it says Canada's best tuna and on the tattoo it says Canadian politics is boring. They just switched the words out a little bit. The artwork's very similar.

Alban:

And the last one Jared Easley, the founder of Podcast Movement, spotted somebody at Podcast Movement with a Podcast Movement tattoo. Yeah, and when I first saw this I thought Jared Easley has a Podcast Movement tattoo, which would kind of make sense. Like you founded a company that became this really large thing and so you kind of wanted to like mark this thing on your body. And it's not Jared who got the tattoo, it's a person who went to the conference and it's on their forearm. That's a big deal to get that tattoo. I mean, I would be afraid to make the joke. Hey, we will pay for you to get a Buzzsprout tattoo, because I'd feel guilty if someone got a Buzzsprout tattoo because it'd be like you don't want that your whole life.

Jordan:

Well, what if we rebranded? You know like what? If?

Kevin:

Podcast Movement rebrands. It becomes better if you rebrand, because then it's like the vintage tattoo yeah, vintage tattoo.

Kevin:

I was just on vacation at a tropical place and if I had had the time to do it, I would have pulled the trigger on it. But my wife and daughter were shopping and I was hanging out with the boys and there was a henna tattoo stand and I was going to get us all like these really cool, like tribal neck tattoos, but they take hours and it's like, oh, they're going to walk up on us. So we wanted to just like reveal that we got these henna neck tattoos and we should do that for Podcast Movement.

Jordan:

You can buy henna online and I've actually done this before, like with friends and stuff. I'm very good at henna art.

Kevin:

So I could do it? Oh, will you be giving henna tattoos at the Buzzsprout booth at?

Jordan:

Podcast Movement. I probably wouldn't, because some people have adverse reactions to henna. Sometimes it can make them like kind of blister and stuff.

Kevin:

That's fine. We have a lawyer on the team who will share it up a liability release.

Jordan:

Well them Sino waiver.

Kevin:

What kind of a pen do you?

Jordan:

use to do that. You just use a bag and you cut the tip off the bag.

Alban:

A bag, what do you mean? A bag, just bag, with, like the ink in it? Yeah, you get a plastic bag with like the ink, think of like decorating cookies.

Kevin:

Kevin, you know you decorate cookies, but a lot finer.

Jordan:

I pictured it more like you use a Sharpie marker or something. Oh man, could you imagine if someone came up with like a Buzzcast tattoo? I mean, I could kind of see it now, actually now I think about it like keep podcasting on their form.

Alban:

Keep podcasting. I would be OK if somebody got that. I'd be like that's cool. Podcasting means a lot to you and that's a catchphrase that we use, so like the one that for the crime junkie one, the be weird, be rude, stay alive. Like if that phrase meant something to you and you love the podcast. I think that makes sense to me. The like I couldn't be big enough fan of any podcast to be like I'm getting the album artwork like on my arm. That doesn't really click in my brain and so I would feel a little bit weird.

Jordan:

Unless, it's pretty. The Joe Rogan artwork is not pretty enough.

Alban:

No, would you ever do a dreamful tattoo.

Kevin:

I've actually had people ask me that.

Jordan:

I think I would the like the moon in the book If I did like a version of that. I think it would be really pretty. Yeah, I can see that I know there's some people like for the puddle list podcast I saw someone got like a wizard on tattoo because that's like a catchphrase. I think that catchphrases are probably a little bit easier to do than podcast logos or artwork. If anyone gets a bus route tattoo, or keep podcasting.

Kevin:

I think you should do. You should do henna podcast at our booth, at podcast movement, at least one.

Jordan:

Oh, or what if we got like the temporary tattoos and we could put them on people? That'd be so cute. Oh yeah, we should do that. How do we get some temporary? We gotta get temporary tattoos stat You've got four days.

Alban:

That would be really funny.

Jordan:

It's time for sound off the segment where you send in your tips, tricks, podcasting, advice. Let's kick it off with some boostograms. We have about five million from Sam Sethi.

Alban:

Yeah, we have 76 sats from Sam Sethi. Oh my gosh, we have another 76 from Sam Sethi. There's literally like 40 of these he's streaming.

Kevin:

He's streaming payments.

Jordan:

He did say a couple things that ice screenshot 765 sats saying micro payments enable direct payments and splits.

Kevin:

Yes, that was good. Yeah, so for those not seeing what we're seeing, what's happening is in our account that collects all of the satoshi donations that we get from people listening to the show. Sometimes you just get boosts which are like large amounts of sats come in all at once and they come with a message. And sometimes you just get it'll say like the person's name or their handle or something, and then like a small sat amount and it'll just come in over and over and over and over and over and over again.

Kevin:

And what happens is these podcast listening apps. Some of them offer you the ability to stream as you listen, so you can send 25 sats for every minute you listen to the podcast or something. So it's a great way to support a show on an ongoing basis. You can set it up once and forget it, and it will just continuously pay out as you're listening. So you don't listen to an episode, you didn't spend any money on it, but if you listen to it you might end up giving them two or three dollars by the time you're done with it.

Alban:

Jordan, why don't you read some of these next ones? You are the topic of conversation in a few of these. Oh, you're the main character.

Kevin:

Look at you.

Jordan:

Yeah, some of these are directly to me. So Nathan Gathright said Jordan, I've got a podcast. Adjacent movie recommendation the Spy who Dumped Me is an action comedy starring Mila Kunis and Kate McKinnon, who I love them both. A single line in the film revealed that the spy's cover identity as a podcaster hinged entirely on the assumption that no one would actually check out his podcast. Oh, no. Two and a half stars.

Kevin:

That's funny, oh man.

Jordan:

That's so bad. Okay, I have to watch that now.

Alban:

Oh yeah, we had another one from Gene Bean. It was a quick follow up to the music stuff. Check out how big of a deal the new value for value stuff has been for Ainsley Costello thanks to Wave Lake and Adam's Boost to Grand Ball.

Kevin:

Yeah, so I think I know who he's talking about. I think because I listened to a podcast episode where Adam was talking about it. I think Ainsley Costello is the musician one of the musicians that he featured and I believe she was the person who was saying that she made I don't know something about her money, let's just call it $30 or $40 or something like that, and she's had her music like on the streaming services for years and doesn't make anywhere near that amount. So, like in one episode of Boost to Grand Ball, adam was able to generate more money for her as a musician than she's got from all these other streaming platforms over time. Yeah, so look up the podcast Boost to Grand Ball and it's best if you can listen to that in one of the new podcast apps that supports value for value streaming payments, such as Castamatic or Fountain Podfans, if you can get into that, and there's a few others, but check out newpodcastappscom for a whole list of them.

Jordan:

Gene Bean Jordan. The episode level splitting you talked about Sam showing you is something I do for anyone I interview on volunteer technologist who wants it. It feels nice to share some of the stats that come in with the people who my show is centered around. That is such a great idea to share it with the guests that are on your show if they want to have that value split as well.

Alban:

Yeah, kind of similar to the Boost to Grand Ball. Nathan Gathright also wrote in and said adding your RSS feed to TikTok lets you link episodes to any of your recent videos, regardless of the audio of that video. Viewers see a listen to the podcast link, which opens up in-app now playing screen with the full episode. Tiktok ever launches Rezo, their music streaming app in the US. Maybe those links will point to Rezo instead. Hypothetically, podcasters could pay to boost these videos to find new listeners. That is very cool. So if you think about it, there's people who are posting TikToks that are little clips from their podcast. Now you can link that video to the full episode and if you found one that started blowing up, you could start paying money to boost that video even more to start getting more listeners inside of TikTok.

Jordan:

Well, not only that. I mean you could have a TikTok talking about the topic that the episode is about and have a link to the episode. So it doesn't even have to be a video completely related to that, and just an update. I've been seeing in our Facebook community group. Someone posted a screenshot because they got the invitation to add their RSS feed. Everyone that I've heard from there's an error, so they haven't been able to actually try it out yet. I think TikTok is having an issue with the RSS feeds For some reason. It's saying it's an invalid link. I don't know what the reason behind that is, but it also said in there I noticed TikTok said that you can add up to three. You can link three podcasts to one account. So that's kind of cool.

Alban:

Interesting. We also got a boost of 10,000 sats from Kevin. No one knows who this is, big booster. Big booster from Kevin said. Great episode y'all and thanks for stepping in, tom. So, kevin, whoever you are out there, you're welcome. Glad you enjoyed the episode with Tom.

Kevin:

Sounds like a great guy. You ready to have your mind blown?

Kevin:

Yeah, I'm ready oh no, it was me, no way. What it was me? Yeah, I was listening to that on my flight and I went ahead and stepped up and paid the few dollars to get my in-flight internet up and decided to give you all a boost. Y'all did great last week. Wow, good episode. Thanks again, tom. If you're listening Probably not Gene Bean, I'll take this next one.

Kevin:

Speaking of the podcast standards project, are they going to actually do anything besides sit dormant? There hasn't been anything new posted or announced by them since the initial bits. Yeah, that's a good question. I can tell you this Standards move slow, and so it's a very different project than what's going on with podcasting 2.0 and podcast namespace and everything going on at the podcast index. They move fast. Their mantra is running with scissors they love to move fast and break stuff.

Kevin:

What the podcast standards project is trying to do is create standards, and standards take a long time for everyone in the space to kind of agree upon something, and then it takes a long time for people to implement something and then slowly over time, you mature it and evolve it. But it is not a fast moving project and so the goals are very different with what's happening with that project. We're just trying to get momentum and consensus around a set of standards right now, and so it's not super exciting. That's why we're partnering with and supporting podcasting 2.0, because that's where all the excitement and fun stuff is happening. This is more of a tool for people building in the space.

Kevin:

Is there a specific set of standards that we can build around that will be supported by a large number of people? So different project. I hope that explains it a little bit. But yeah, the group is still active and the goals are still there and they make a lot of sense and Buzzsprout supports them and we support them. But it's going to move slow and that's just part of the nature of it.

Jordan:

Are you guys having a thunderstorm? Yep, I can hear it. That's crazy.

Alban:

That's how they work, all right.

Jordan:

And then on Twitter X, we got a tweet post, colleague, this is driving me crazy, okay.

Alban:

Just call it a tweet.

Jordan:

We got a tweet from Carol remarks, who recently started listening to Buzzcast again. So, hi, carol. She said when it be cool to have the option to comment on a podcast as you listen on the podcast platform, that would be cool and that's something that will probably be doable in the near future, right, because of podcasting 2.0.

Kevin:

Yeah, We've held on off on adding it to Buzzsprout, specifically because there's this, an idea that has been being worked on for a very long time, and the podcast name space project, which is I think it's called social interact or open podcast comments or something like that, and the idea would be that you could comment anywhere and it would, you'd have the ability to see it across a bunch of different apps. So let's just say you're listening to somebody's podcast on the Buzzsprout website and you dropped a comment in. Then somebody listening later in pod fans or cast a magic or something, would see that same comment, be able to read it, to be able to respond to it. So there's a lot of technology that needs to take place in order to make that stuff happen. We could absolutely add some sort of proprietary system just for Buzzsprout podcasts, but we think the bigger idea is much more exciting, and so, as that project continues to develop, we're just keeping our eyes on it and if it ever gets to a place where it makes sense and it's implementable and it looks like it's going to work and it's going to get some broad support, of course we will jump in.

Kevin:

But for right now, comments are kind of closed to each independent platform. So if you come on an Apple, you're only going to see on Apple. If you in fact you can't even comment on Apple. You can just leave a rating or review some other things like pod chaser and stuff. You can do that stuff, but again it just lives in pod chaser. So we're mostly interested in the bigger solution, which isn't quite there yet, but it's closed.

Alban:

Can you hear this?

Jordan:

It's so loud.

Alban:

It's unbelievable. I mean, I can't see even a foot out of my window right now. It's completely like we're being slammed.

Jordan:

Yeah, I'm not sure magic mastering is going to take this all out, but if anyone hears any weird like thunder or rain pelting windows, it's because there's a huge storm and we're trying to wrap up this episode. All right, so we got a response to last episode's question what is your why or inspiration behind starting your podcast? And the response is from Richard.

Richard:

Hello, I'm Richard Good from the nighttime on still waters podcast. Although I've always loved radio and the spoken word, my inspiration has not been a personal podcast but a song. Donald Fagan's nightfly captures beautifully the power of a human voice in an uncertain darkness, that co-creation with the listener of a shared community and vivid sense of place, a place where reality and imagination coexist and create something wonderful.

Jordan:

I just want to listen to Richard on National Geographic Talk about endangered species. That is all like endangered butterflies. That's all I want to hear is Richard on a nature documentary.

Kevin:

Yeah, amazing voice.

Jordan:

I didn't hear what you said. I was just so entranced I don't even know what happened. Richard needs to call in a lot more often.

Kevin:

That's fantastic and that's a very cool place to pull inspiration from. So thanks for sharing, Richard.

Alban:

Kevin, since you came back from a week off, do you have a question you'd like to ask? It's not my turn.

Jordan:

Yeah, it's your turn, Alban.

Kevin:

Yeah, I know, I know you see it All right.

Alban:

This is a question, then, that is inspired by what we're going through right now, and Jordan, you as well. Right now, we are having a massive storm at my house, and I'm talking like I can't see more than a couple feet out the window, and rain is going sideways Like it's a real Florida storm. So we're getting hit by something and Jordan has had since we've known each other a CrossFit gym moving near you. You've had a lawnmower repair shop at some point, you've had all sorts of ran, yet a small airport nearby and airplanes were flying around your house. So I want to know what is the worst environment you've ever recorded a podcast and what did you do to improve the audio?

Jordan:

That's a great question.

Alban:

So like what messed it up? I mean the kids in the house. Was there people interrupting you? Or did you have to record in an airport because you wanted to catch, like, maybe, a chance to hear the sound of the alien conference down below, or whatever it may have been? Tell us about the story and we want to hear it.

Jordan:

So to have your response featured on our next episode, leave a 30 second voice message at potinboxcom. Slash buzz sprout. Tweet the answer to us at buzzcast podcast or send it to us in a boostagram. And, as always, thanks for listening and keep podcasting.

Kevin:

You guys know what this is.

Jordan:

You finally got one.

Kevin:

Alban got it a while ago and just put it in our podcast equipment. Like to explore later pile yeah, and we haven't gotten around to exploring it yet. But I actually have a use for this coming up. I might be joining the ranks of soon to be pod fader.

Alban:

Tell us what is in your hand. Kevin, you were on a podcast. This isn't a YouTube show. You've got to tell people what you're holding.

Kevin:

Oh sorry, I'm holding a portable recording microphone. It's the Tulia portable recorder and it's very cool, so I'll talk about this in a second. But yes, I'm starting to podcast. I'm already anticipating that it's going to pod fade very quickly. This show does not have. The outlook is not good, it is grim.

Jordan:

I am so curious to know what this is, but I'll be honest If you go do the pod score thing that Alex put together, that we talked about.

Alban:

This show. It's not going to look great. If you're saying I've already played on pod fading and I haven't recorded it yet.

Kevin:

Yeah, no, this is just a. It's a bit of a manipulation and a bit of a podcast, so that's why I think it's doomed in the beginning. But my oldest child is going to college. She leaves this weekend. We were driving her up to college on Saturday.

Kevin:

We're getting her moved in and I asked her if she would be interested. I'm sure we're going to talk, like she talked to her mom a lot more than she'll talk to me, but I'm sure I'll connect with her, you know, once or twice a week. But I was thinking is there a way for me to have a scheduled time where I have a conversation with her every week? And so I asked her if she'd be interested in doing like the high school to college, you know transition podcast, and just like, maybe for her first semester, maybe for her first year, we get on the phone, you know, for 30 minutes once a week and she just kind of runs me through her week. I'll ask her questions about what she did, who she met, what classes were like, how's the food, yada, yada, yada, and she was open to the idea. So she's agreed to at least do one episode with me, and so we'll be.

Kevin:

And so I grabbed the little portable mic because we're driving up on Saturday so I figured I could ask her some questions over in the car and while we're moving into the dorm and all of that. And then I'm gonna follow up with that with like the first episode a week later and see our first week of school was. But there's so many questions that parents have and kids have about this high school to college transition. So I thought like, well, I looked around for a few podcasts and I couldn't find any that looked compelling. So I was like why don't we create one? It'll be fun and it'll keep us connected and it might be fun for me to do because I like podcasting. So we're gonna give a shot. What do you think? Words of encouragement.

Jordan:

Yeah, I like it. I think that's really fun and I think that is a really good way to make sure that you stay in touch with your daughter.

Kevin:

Great, and so I like to answer Tom's question from last week what's your why? What's your inspiration? Like I'm not necessarily trying to go out there and create the best podcast for parents and students who were going to college for the first time, but I am trying to stay connected to my daughter and know what's going on in her life and what she's doing, and so, at a minimum, like that is my goal. So, if anybody listens or not, as long as we get to do this, for as long as it lasts, I'm excited about it.

Alban:

That's really cool, Kevin. I'm trying to think of like catchy names for the podcast. Do you have a name?

Kevin:

Don't really have a name yet. No, I've started thinking about a few ideas and I don't know. I wanna record maybe the first couple of episodes first, before I worry about the name too much, which does go kind of against the general guidance that we give people. But I kind of wanna feel how the content is coming out. Is it more about, like her trying to figure out what college is like, or anxieties, or she's also doing sports in college, so is it gonna be more about sports stuff? Is that what we're talking more about? And so I figured I'd record a couple before I locked in on it.

Alban:

Yeah, I think that's a great idea. I actually am starting to change my tune on that a little bit, like you do need to have a name and artwork and all that stuff, but the chances that that's gonna say stagnant for years and just be whatever you made the first day is pretty low. Like, mostly you're going to rebrand or change Jordan, and I just recorded an episode for Buzzsprout Conversations and one of the things she talked about was initially the show was all about it was for kids and eventually she found out actually it was also for adults and so she did a slight change in direction where the show was going and I think everyone probably experiences that and you probably will as well. Yeah.

Kevin:

I started. I was flipping through my phone the other day and I was showing her some pictures of her and I was thinking can I use any of these for podcast artwork? She's like no, no, no, no. So I think that's gonna be the hardest part of this whole production is probably trying to figure out what we use for podcast artwork.

Jordan:

So this microphone.

Kevin:

Yeah, so I was gonna tell you about this microphone. Do you want me to tell you about it? Yeah, it is called. I think it's. Hang on, let me plug it in so I can get the real name of it.

Jordan:

It's the Tula.

Kevin:

You're right, tula, but it doesn't have like a model number or something on it. So it is the Tula mic and the one I have is red. But they've got a couple of cool colors. They've got cream, which is basically white-ish, silver, black, red and seafoam, and so they're very pretty. They're very well designed and they are portable. You can use them like you can plug them in USB to your computer and it's got a little adapter to put it on a mic stand if you want, and you can just use it as a desktop microphone. But it's also portable. It has a battery in it and it has some storage like memory, so you can record on the go and then just come home and plug it in your computer and dump the recordings right off of it.

Kevin:

I was actually in the office looking for we used to have a Zoom H4N, which is kind of like the standard default portable recorder for most podcasters and journalists and stuff. We have one of those and I was gonna grab that, but I couldn't find it, which means somebody has it and didn't use our checkout sheet to grab it. So I but I saw this there instead and I was like, oh, I'm gonna try this, and I brought it home and I started recording just some test recordings all around different environments in my house and it sounds really good. It's whatever microphone setup they have in here is really great and it has two different modes. You can record just like the normal raw recording or you can turn on.

Kevin:

There they have an active noise cancellation setting and you can turn that on and you can record and that does a good job too. And the really nice thing is that when you have that turned on, it gives you two recordings every time you plug it into your computer to drag the files off. So you get the noise canceling version. And if you like that, great. But if you're like, oh, it's too much or too heavy or distorted or muffled, my voice too much or something, the original is there as well. So then you can clean that up however you want. Like, if you just wanna use that and then run it through your magic mastering, you can do that.

Jordan:

When we were in a podcast movement I think that was Dallas the creator of that microphone came up to us and he showed me. He did a recording while we were there and then gave me a headphone to listen to it. So we're in the expo hall and he's holding that microphone that you have the Tula mic like 10 inches from his face and just talking very quietly and you could hear him perfectly in the noise canceling and it's loud in that expo hall. Did you know that he toured with like Beck?

Kevin:

I remember him telling us some stories, but it wasn't like a loud, crazy environment that we were in.

Jordan:

Yeah, I didn't realize it until he was actually a really cool guy, and then I hung out with him for a little bit and then someone was like did you know he wasn't Beck? No, what that's so cool. But I mean, yeah, so he's got a whole bunch of microphones because he founded this like microphone company. He also was in a group called Brazzaville, but yeah, he's pretty cool. And that microphone is very cool.

Kevin:

Yeah.

Jordan:

It sounds amazing.

Kevin:

It sounds great and it looks great and it's fun to just kind of fiddle with, too on your desk, like it's engineered really well, but it's one that we don't talk about a whole lot and podcasters don't talk about a whole lot, but I think people should start talking about it, especially if you do any remote interviews, like just like in-person interviews away from your desk, that you need to be able to grab a mic and go and just record. Something Like it seems to work really well in any environment and I'm really impressed. The one thing I would say that I'm not super happy with is that, since it is designed so well like that, none of the buttons got a bunch of buttons on both sides of this microphone. None of them are labeled, and so I did have to pull up the manual and memorize the buttons. Like I gave myself a little 10 minute masterclass on what is this button, what is this button, and memorize them all and played with it, and so that took a few minutes.

Kevin:

But now I know how to use it and it's fantastic. I know what all the buttons are, but just looking at little icons on the buttons themselves, it's hard to figure out what it does. So, out of the box. The experience is a little bit like oh my gosh, what does this do? It's got buttons all over it and none of them are labeled. But take 10 minutes, read the manual and then you're good to go.

Jordan:

And it fits in your pocket.

Kevin:

Yeah, it fits in your pocket, so tiny, or your purse, and if you don't carry a purse, then they sell leather cases and dead cats and lots of cool accessories for it too. And yeah, and a lot of the stuff's available on Amazon. Some of it's not, but I just went straight to the tulamikescom website and checked out other stuff Very nice. So worth considering if you're a podcaster and you do recordings away from your desk sometimes.

Intro
Podcast Movement Denver
(Cont.) Podcast Movement Denver
Conspiracy Theories Surrounding Denver Airport
PodScore Quiz
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Descript & Squadcast Integration
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